DRAFT (Posting because I need family assistance to finish the blog)— On Genealogy: The LEE Side of Me …

Hello all!  Happy Thursday!   It’s a soggy, dreary and wet one out there as I write today … ever so fitting as today’s blog entry #6 focusses on my English roots and follows my paternal grand mother’s side.  I haven’t written exclusively about them yet, but, I have mentioned Gramma Sally in preceding posts.  This blog entry follows, the LEE family line in Yorkshire, England.

The LEE’s were a hard working, blue collared bunch.  They worked lived primarily in the Yorkshire, in little towns or hamlets and worked mostly factory jobs.  Meltham Mills was known for its many textile mills back in those days.

The large majority of them lived on Shady Row in Meltham Mills.  Shady Row was a row of mill worker’s properties built next to the mills at Meltham Mills for the employee of for the workers at the Jonas Brook Bros. mills (which I have confirmed is where most of the males worked based on census results). So, it was a co-op community.  Census returns indicate that there were a total of 60 houses.  At the time of the 1841 Census, 57 of the houses were occupied, with a total of 339 people were residing there (averaging nearly 6 people per property).

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 11.08.22 AM.png
1929 map – Shady Row is highlighted in green. It was still in existence in the late 1940s, but had been demolished by 1965.
Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 11.17.49 AM.png
Shady Row (highlighted in green) can be seen in this aerial photograph from 1926, by which time the rows of housing were hemmed in by the mill buildings

Sarah Ann Lee

When Sarah Ann Lee, affectionately known as Sally, was born on December 7, 1922, her father, Joseph, was 26, and her mother, Ellen (née Plant), was 30.

She was born in MELTHAM-MILLS, Yorkshire, England, a village and a chapelry in Almondbury parish, W. R. Yorkshire. The village stands ¾ of a mile E of Meltham, and 3 WSW of Berry-Brow r. station. The chapelry comprises parts of the townships of Meltham and Honley.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 12.19.06 PMI’ve located her birth registration in England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1916-2005, for births registered the first quarter of 1923.  I have not been able to locate her actual birth record as of yet.  I need to confirm her actual  year of birth as there is a discrepancy  from what I have been told i.e. 1922 and the historical records confirming her registration in 1923.  Does anyone have a copy of a birth certificate?

Her father Joseph Edward passed away in 1930 in England at the age of 34 and her mother Ellen Ann passed away on May 9, 1936, at the age of 44.  So, she was orphaned at the tender age of 13.  Does anyone have any idea of what they passed away from so young? I can’t find anything.

She married Benjamin Richards on June 20, 1945, in Agbrigg, Yorkshire, England, at the age of 22 while Benny was there on military service during WWII.

Transcribed excerpt from Grampa’s military record:

June 20 1945:  Married with permission to Miss Sarah Ann Lee in Agbrigg, Yorkshire, England.

Per my Grampa Benny’s military records her address as next of kin is noted as 4 Pick Hiss Rd, Meltham Yorkshire, England. I am wondering if she was living with her sister, Mary at this time.  What did she do from 13 to 22?  Who did she live with?  Did she have another boyfriend before grampa? Did she work?  I literally cannot locate any records of her for this period of time …  How did she and grampa meet?   

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 11.55.47 AMAs we know, Gramma was a war bride.  She arrived at Pier 21 in Halifax in 1946, which is Canada’s equivalent to the USA’s Ellis Island in New York.  I was able to locate her in the Canadian Wives Bureau records and have just have written to the Department of Immigration for a true copy of her arrival documents, which will likely contain the passenger log and her Canadian naturalization documentation.

Sarah sailed to her new home on the RMS Aquitania, a Cunard Line ocean liner built in Clydebank, Scotland. The ship was launched on 21 April 1913 and sailed on herScreen Shot 2017-06-22 at 11.56.16 AM.png maiden voyage to New York on 30 May 1914. Aquitania was the third in Cunard Line’s “grand trio” of express liners including the RMS Mauritania and RMS Lusitania, and she was the last surviving four-funnelled ocean liner. Widely considered one of the most attractive ships of her time, Aquitania earned the nickname “Ship Beautiful”.  In her 36 years of service, Aquitania survived military duty in both world wars. After completing troopship service, the vessel was handed back to Cunard in 1946, and was used to transport war brides and their children to Canada under charter from the Canadian government. This final service created a special fondness for Aquitania in Halifax, Nova Scotia, the port of disembarkation for these immigration voyages

I understand she that took the train from Halifax, NS to Mattawa, ON where Grampa met her and they carried on to Témiscaming QC by train (there were no roads leading into town at that time) to live with Lina  (Angelina – Benny’s mother/Sally’s M-I-L) in Lumsden.  This was stated in documentation twice.  Once is Benny’s military records on discharge and in Sally’s document from the Canadian Archives which I obtained earlier this week.

Excerpt from Benny’s military records:

” … Richards married in England and expects his wife to join him in a few months.  They can live with his mother until they secure a house through the paper company, who are building homes for returning service personnel”.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 12.54.05 PM
The Canadian Wives Bureau log is hard to read due to poor quality  “B-66965, Pte B.G.  RICHARDS, Sarah A.  19 Pickmill Rd, Meltham, Huddersfield, Yorks”. In the section where is says Address in Canada – last column –  “Mrs. L. Richards (M/Law) Temiskaming P.Q.”

Sally and Benny had seven children during their marriage (Christine, Malcolm, Ralph, Gwendolyn, Rosemary, Patrick, Kenneth).  She had 7 children in 9 years.

She was an avid knitter and puzzler (no she didn’t like to puzzle people, she enjoyed working on puzzles 😉),  I remember she would make them when I would visit her in Verdun, QC.  I understand that she was also a teetotalers – I had no idea what that term even meant until 2:05 PM.  Def’n as per Wikipedia: When at drinking establishments, teetotalers (or teetotallers) either abstain from drinking completely, or consume non-alcoholic beverages such as water, juice, tea, coffee, virgin drinks, mocktails, and alcohol-free beer.  She apparently ceased drinking alcohol after getting a little too tipsy one evening on rye (It’s ok gramma, haven’t we all?).

In connecting with my uncle Kenny and my aunt Gwen (I wish my dad was still alive so I could ask him some if this) –  they moved in to 102 Anvik Avenue (in Témiscaming) in or about 1955.

At that time Témiscaming was a company (CIP) town and the company owned everything including the homes. The Company sold the houses in or about 1972, Sally and Benny

Screen Shot 2017-04-23 at 6.25.51 PM.png
102 Anvik is the unit on the right hand side with the brown door (circa 2016)

bought theirs. The row house was tiny.  4 rooms total (living room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, 1 washroom). It was only 2 stories, no basement. Aunty Gwen remembers them digging out the basement until they hit a big rock … but, they were able to move the furnace down there.  Only the front bedroom had closet space … Grampa built one in the back room for the 3 girls … that and a double bed.  The bathroom had a toilet and bathtub … no sink.  They were 9 living there – 7 kids,  2 adults.  There was also an enclosed, unheated back porch.  The whole space was about 600 sq ft.  The address was originally 502 Elm Ave, but the Dutch Elm disease killed all the Elm trees ands the town renamed it Anvik Ave and renumbered the houses….. the number became 102 instead of 502.

Her husband Benjamin George passed away on June 17, 1977, in Montréal, Quebec, at the age of 61. They had been married 31 years.

Gramma Sally ending up selling the house to Lucien Bernard for $6,000 in 1978 and moved to Verdun, Quebec to live with her daughter Gwen, son-in-law Serge and her grandkids Marc and Caroline.

INSERT PICS OF SHE AND I

She passed away on March ** 1993 in Montréal, Quebec, at the age of 70 years of cardiac and renal failure resulting from complications of Diabetes Mellitus.

I was pregnant with my oldest, Cassandra, at the time that Gramma passed.  It was a tough weekend as my Grand Mémère on my mom’s side and Gramma Sally on my dad’s side passed away 2 days apart and at 7 months pregnant I had to trek up North to attend both funerals on the same day – in different provinces – thankfully Témiscaming and Bonfield are only about 1h10mins apart.

DOES ANYONE HAVE GRAMMA’S OBIT? (aunt Renee does)

She is buried alongside her husband in Témiscaming, QC – how fitting of a tombstone header “A small corner in a foreign land, that is forever England”

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.55.39 PM


***I have decided to keep the bios of her lineage to a minimum.  I just have too much information and photos to add to this to make it easy to follow***

Joseph Edward Lee and Ellen Ann Plant

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.41.20 PM.pngJoseph Edward Lee was born on August 24, 1896, in Batley, Yorkshire, England. Batley is a town in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Batley is a very old town in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It was mentioned in the Doomsday Book in 1086 and was listed in the 1379 Poll Tax.

When he was born his father, Tom, was 27 as was his mother, Hannah.

His brother George Victor was killed in action on November 4, 1915 in France and Flanders in WWI.

He married Ellen Ann Plant in December 1918 in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England when he was 22 years old.

He died as a young father in 1930 in England at the age of 34 I am looking for a cause of death – I suspect he was ill because the census records indicate that they moved from 33 Shady Row where they had lived for many years to 6 Shady Row, in 1930 – the same year he died.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.41.41 PMWhen Ellen Ann Plant was born on May 10, 1892, in Honley, Yorkshire, England, her father, Tom, was 29, and her mother, Sarah, was 31. Honley, a village in West Yorkshire, England. It is situated near to Holmfirth and Huddersfield, and on the banks of the River Holme in the Holme Valley.

She was baptized on Dec 10 1892 at St Mary with Brockholes, St George, Yorkshire, England (Honley).

April 2 1911 – the census notes that they live at 4 Oldsfield in Honley. She is single & 19 y/o. She works as a Cotton Frame Tenter at a cotton factory. A frame tenter works in the Spinning Room & looks after spinning frames. Her father must have died as her mom is noted as being the head

She died on May 9, 1936, at the age of 43. It is said that she passed from Dropsy. We know that the term Dropsy is no longer used in today’s medical terms – it’s an ol’ fashioned term to describe the presence of generalized swelling, but you just get or die from edema without some etiology – usually it was due to acute decompensated heart failure. Prior to the twentieth century, heart failure was known as Dropsy.  I’ve seen this Dx come up in a few other death certificates throughout my family tree journey.


Tom Lee & Hannah Crabtree

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.43.13 PMWhen Tom Lee was born in 1869 in Liversedge, Yorkshire, England, his father, Samuel, was 43 and his mother, Martha, was 45. He married Hannah Crabtree on January 26, 1889, in Batley, Yorkshire, England.

In the April 2 1011 census he is noted as Married; Head of House. There are 9 people living in a 4 room dwelling at 3 Shady Row Meltham Mills, Meltham. He is working as a Bobbin Maker. MIL Sarah Crabtree lives with them as she is widowed (72). The census notes of 8 children; 6 were alive & 2 dead.

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.43.30 PMHannah Crabtree was born in 1869 in Hull, Yorkshire, England, to Sarah Ann Pickles, age 30, and William Crabtree, age 40.

She was imprisoned on Aug 25 1890 for obscene language at HMP Wakefield.  Sentence Imprisonment or Servitude Released on August 29, 1890.  She was jailed along with mother Sarah Ann Crabtree.  I am making the assumption they got into an argument and used threw in a few F bombs lol


Samuel Lee & Martha Lee 

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.44.34 PM.pngWhen Samuel Lee was born in January 1826 in Holmfirth, Yorkshire, England, his father, William Lee, was 26 and his mother, Mary Raine, was 22.

He was baptized on 26 Mar 1826 at Holmfirth, Holy Trinity, Yorkshire, England.

Samuel Lee married Martha Lee in Almondbury, Yorkshire, England, on February 9, 1845, when he was 19 years old.  Marriage records indicates that Samuel was a is a  Bachelor, employed as a Spinner and that Martha was a Spinster. They marked their signatures with X’s so that tells me that they were unable to write.

In 1851 they lived in Honley, Yorkshire, England, in 185 and resided at 65 Dean House. He and Martha and Harriett and Sarah Ann are all living here.  He is employed as a Spooner.  As a Sponner he would work in the Spinning Room and would operate one or more usually two facing each other, spinning machines, each with many spindles, to make thread. Because the floor beneath spinning machines was soaked in the oil from the cotton, spinners usually worked barefoot. Spinners normally employed their own piecers and paid them directly. A spinning mule might have up to 1200 spindles from end to end and be nearly 100 yards long. A spinner would be paid according to the amount of thread produced. Poor quality cotton with short fibres broke more easily. Ask a spinner to spin Surat and they would be most unhappy, knowing that their piecers would be unable to keep up with the number of breaks, forcing them to stop the mule.

On the 1881 census they lived in Batley, Yorkshire, England.They are living at Temperance House at 175 Wilton St. He is living with Martha, William (who is working as a Clogger –  i.e. made wooden shoes “clogs”, in England they were usually leather with thick wooden soles) and Tom who is in school. They also have a boarder staying with them. Sam is working as an Eating House Keeper (would an eating house keeper mean someone who owned a cafe or was just managing it?)

He died in 1901 at the age of 75.

Martha Lee was born in 1824 in Honley.  The marriage record indicates that Martha’s Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.44.42 PMdad’s name is John Lee. He and William both worked as Weavers.  So her maiden name is Lee as well?

Martha is absent from the 1901 census leading me to believe that she passed away between 1891 and the 1901 census. In this census Sam is listed as widowed and is living with William Brown (75) and Martha Brown (75).


William Lee & Mary Raine

William Lee was born in 1800 in Newbiggin, Durham, England. He married Mary Raine Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 9.46.22 PM.pngon March 4, 1821, in Middleton in Teesdale, Durham, England. They had ten children in 21 years. He died on May 17, 1883, having lived a long life of 83 years.

In the 1851 census they are living in Holwick, Yorkshire, England  He is listed as Head of Household. He is working as a Lead Miner. He has some of his grand children living with them (not sure whose, two have last name Lee and the other Longmire).

In the 1871 census, we find them in Wooldale, Yorkshire, England, they are residing at 6 Muslim Hall. They have a visitor, Joseph Broadbent, age 26 who is a Grocer’s Assistant. William is still working a 70 as a Wool Weaver.

In 1881 we find him living in the Hamlet of Holwick, Yorkshire, England.  Marital Status: Widower. He is a retired lead miner and farmer.

Mary Raine was born in abt 1800 in Yorkshire, England,died in October 1874 when she was 74 years old.  I don’t know too much abt Mary right now.  I still have research to do on here.

LOOKING FOR FAMILY INFORMATION AND STORIES ON GRAMMA TO ADD TO HERE

On Genealogy: My Genetic Ancestry DNA Results Are In!

I know I already posted a blog today.  But, as I was walking out the door, I got an email from Ancestry that my DNA results were in and I had to check them stat!

If you’ve been a regular visitor to my blog, you’ll likely know that I’ve been working hard on my family tree and tracing my roots.  I’ve come across some interesting finds along the way, some of which I have posted, others whose blogs I continue to work on and others which I continue to dig into the past to verify facts.

About DNA Testing:

genealogical DNA test is a DNA-based test which looks at specific locations of a person’s genome in order to determine ancestral ethnicity and genealogical relationships.  AncestryDNA utilizes some of the latest autosomal testing technology to revolutionize the way you discover your family history. This service utilizes advanced DNA science to predict your genetic ethnicity and help you find new family connections. It maps ethnicity going back multiple generations and provides insight

I chose to use AncestryDNA since I already use their services for my family tree.  The AncestryDNA test analyzes your entire genome—all 23 pairs of chromosomes—as opposed to only looking at the Y-chromosome or mitochondrial DNA (which makes other types of tests gender specific). Your autosomal chromosomes carry genetic information from both your parents that’s passed down through the generations.

Genealogical DNA tests do not give information about medical conditions or diseases.

The Process:

Taking a genealogical DNA test requires the submission of a DNA sample. The process of DNA testing is fairly simple and relatively inexpensive, I paid $129.00.  The DNA kit was sent to me via Ancestry, at which time I did a spit test (accumulated my saliva into a tube, to the fill line).  Once that was completed, I put everything back into the self-addressed stamped box and mailed it to Ireland for processing.

On May 10 2017, they acknowledged receiving my sample, and that they were sent to the processing lab on June 13 2017.

Today, I was finally notified that my results are in … I have been waiting a little over two months for this!   I haven’t looked at the results on my Ancestry.ca account yet.  I have a pretty good idea of what to expect because of all of the work I’ve been doing on my family tree lately, but, I’m going to take a gander here and see how close I am when I read the results.

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 11.18.29 AM

My Presumptions:

British and French: I know that we have roots dating back the to the 1500/1600’s coming from France and Britain, so I am expecting to see some of those genes appear in the results.

I also know that we have some Scot, Irish and perhaps Nordic blood.  The Norman DNA may show up as Scandinavian of some sort.  I am assuming this because the line I am tracing at the moment indicates that there was some land purchases made by one of my ancestors from William the Conquerors half brother, and Nord, British mixing was common at the time.

I also know that we are Native American because I have posted on that already.

The percentages and other lines however, that I am unsure – so I am very curious about this.

The Results:

Ok, let’s see how close I was.  And, the results are …. Drum Roll PLEASE …..

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 11.32.58 AM.png

My ethnicity estimate shows where my ancestors came from hundreds to thousands of years ago.  Ancestry.ca calculates it by comparing my DNA to the DNA of a reference panel of people with deep roots to specific places around the world.

 

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 11.24.08 AM

Genetic Communities show where my family probably lived in the past few hundred years. Ancestry created these by identifying groups of AncestryDNA members who are genetically connected to each other.

Overall Thoughts: 

On ethnicity estimate:  Very surprised that it did not pick up an First Nations, since I have lineage to prove it and I have my Algonquin status 🤷🏻‍♀️

Also, surprised that I am as much Irish and Scandinavian as I am, but at least that tells me I’m on the right path as I’m doing my research.  I did see reference of a few of my family members immigrating from Ireland including my great grandfather – so maybe there are a few more?

I’ve found no traces of Italian, Greek, Spanish or Portuguese in my tree as of yet.  I’m shocked by the only 9% French, as I have been able to trace my tree to Quebec and then back to France.

On genetic communities:  It was bang on!  The French settlement in Beauce and Montmorency are accurate with the ‘very likely’ as is the English in Yorkshire – that’s where my Gramma Sally was born before moving to Canada as a WWII War Bride in 1946.  My whole on the LEE side is from Yorkshire.

Well this was an interesting little genome experience that I am sure will help on the further discovery of my roots.

Namaste

T xo

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Genealogy: My Quaker Connection; Descendant of John Milk, British Colonial America, 1662

Today’s blog on genealogy #5 is on the lineage of the Milk family.  This surname has long been associated with the county of Norfolk, England, where it appears about twenty-two times in proportion to each 10,000 of the population of that county.  There, throughout history, it has been associated with small landowners.

This is was interesting line to research and write about as I never imagined having anyone in my lineage trace back to Colonial America, never mind some who resided in Salem, Massachusetts during the Witch Trials.

d90394ef-df15-4568-b438-11f21ae0fe42.jpg

The surname MILK first appeared on record in America in 1662 with the mention of John Milk of Salem, Massachusetts in the town vital records where he was appointed as Cowherd for the town of Salem and then was chosen to chimney sweep.  Screen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.19.18 PM.png

In Colonial America in 1662, The Massachusetts Bay Colony’s charter was accepted by England as long as they extended the vote to all landowners and allowed for freedom of worship for Anglicans.

The home of John Milk was listed in “(Rambles in Old Boston, by Rev, Edward G. Porter, 1887, p.288.) It was built some fifty years earlier than the Paul Revere home some 300 feet away across a little Square from the corner of Sun Court and Moon Street, just south of the Old North Church and North of Faneuil Hall “the Cradle of Liberty” near Milk Street.

IMMIGRANT Family 

John Milk I  (B: 1640 Norfolk, England, D: Nov 26 1689 – Salem, Massachusetts) m. Sarah Weston (Wesson) (B: 1656 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1685 – Salem, Massachusetts) on m. 3 APR 1665

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 10.02.27 PM
From the Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988

Screen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.23.33 PM

John Milk I died on Nov 26 1689.  The following is his Last Will & Testament:

Screen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.12.24 PMScreen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.12.45 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.26.32 PM

 

FIRST Generation

John Milk II: (B: Jan 8 1668 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1720 Boston, Massachusetts), shipwright, married:

(1) Elizabeth Hempfield (1670 – 1707), daughter of Edmund Hempfield of Salem, on 20 Aug. 1689.

Children of first marriage

  • John Milk, b. abt. 1690, died young
  • Job Milk

(2)  Mary Scolly (Scolby) at Boston, 30 Oct. 1707, who subsequently married Francis Hudson abt ******

Children of second marriage:

  • John Milk III, b. 23 June 1708/09, m. Jane Marvin (Marvel)
  • James Milk, b. 31 Jan. 1710/11, m. (1)Sarah Brown ; (2) Mrs. Mollie Peering
  • Mary Jane Milk, b. abt. 1713

My lineage follows the marriage to Elizabeth Hempfield (B:  Jan 8 1668 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1707 – Salem, Massachusetts).

The below excerpt talks about their homestead and surrounding buildings.

 

d1dea0fa-aa0d-4a67-9658-6520ce57dd6c
Close-up of 1700 map showing John Milk lot in yellow (located on current day Washington St somewhere around Federal or Bridge Streets)

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.07.11 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.10.06 PMScreen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.10.26 PM

SECOND Generation

Job Milk I (B: 1695 – Salem, Massachusetts, D: 1778 in Little Compton, Newport County, Province of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations) m.  Abigail Devol (B: 1695 – Newport, Rhode Island, D: 12 Jul 1719 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts) on July 12 1719 in Little Compton, RI.  Abigail was the daughter of Johnathan + Hannah (née Audley).

Screen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.51.50 PMScreen Shot 2017-06-04 at 6.52.32 PMScreen Shot 2017-06-04 at 7.03.29 PMScreen Shot 2017-06-04 at 7.04.23 PM

Note: The association and acceptance by the Quakers of the time, imply that Job Milk and his family were probably Quakers. Although there are no known records of this, it is recorded that Phineas Chase, who lived close to Job Milk, and was father to two of Job’s sons-in-law was a Quaker.

Screen Shot 2017-06-20 at 11.13.32 PM.png

Footnote:  Some information has been borrowed in part from: History And Genealogy Of The Milk-Milks Family – October 15, 2011 by Grace CroftLee MilkGrace Irene Barnhart.  This information was only borrowed for the sake of completing an accurate family portrait of my lineage to the Milk family as early settlers and not for any wage or profit.


THIRD Generation

Job Milk II (B: April 17 1725 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts, D: 1804 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts) m. Amy Fish (B: Oct 29 1729 – Dartmouth, Massachusetts, D: Belkshire, Massachusetts).  He married Amy Fish 2 Nov 1746 at Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island.  Amy Fish was born at Dartmouth, Bristol, Massachusetts 29 Oct 1729 daughter of Thomas Fish and Mercy Mary Coggeshall .

They were the parents of 9 children:
Benjamin Milk born 1747.
Sarah Milk born 1749. 
Job Milk born 1751.
Mary Milk born 1752.
Jonathan Milk born 1755.
David Milk born 1757.
Cabel Milk born 1759.
Thomas Ambrose Milk born 1761.
Amy Milk born 1763.


FOURTH Generation

Sarah Milk (B: 1749 – D: Eardley,) m. Dudley Moore (B: 1747 – Nine Partners, Duchess, New York,  D: 1815: Eardley, (Hull) Québec). They married at Saratoga, New York .

Dudley Moore’s parents were Jedediah Moore and Dorothy Begnell (I’ll get more into the “Bicknell” story in another blog).

They were the parents of 9 children:
Sarah Moore born Abt 1769.
Jedediah Moore born Abt 1771.
Dudley Moore born 8 Aug 1773.
Roger Moore born Abt 1774. 
Benjamin Moore born Abt 1776.
Martin Moore born Abt 1779.
Job Moore born Abt 1781.
David Moore born Abt 1783.
Rebecca Moore born Abt 1785.


FIFTH Generation

Roger Moore (B: 1775 – Rutland, Vermont, D: 1860 – Napean, Ontario) m.  Sarah Hicks (B: 1775 – New York,  D: Nov 27 1872 – Québec)


SIXTH Generation

Olive Moore (B: Sept 10 1821 – Napean, Ontario, D: 1871 – Eardley, Québec) m.  Ambrose Richards (B: Feb 27 1816 – Quebec,  D: Jan 9 1864 – Eardley, Québec)

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 12.27.40 AM.png


SEVENTH Generation

George Richards (B: July 26 1859 – Eardley Quebec, D: April 16 1942 – Mattawa Ontario) m.  Cecelia McKenzie (B: Dec 9 1851 – Renfrew Ontario, D: Sept 13 1921 – Mattawa Ontario)

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 12.30.36 AM


EIGHTH Generation 

Ambrose Richards (B: Dec 12 1887 – Mattawa Ontario, D: 1957 – Mattawa Ontario) m. Bridget Angelina Mullen (B: Jan 3 1887 – Vinton, Québec, D: April 10 1976 – Témiscaming, Québec)

Screen Shot 2017-06-21 at 12.36.04 AM


NINTH Generation

Benjamin Richards (B: Feb 10 1916 – Sturgeon Falls Ontario, D: June 17 1977 – Montréal, Québec) m.  Sarah Ann Lee (B: Dec 7 1922 – Meltham Mills, Yorkshire England, D: March 1993 – Montréal, Quebec)


TENTH Generation

Patrick James Richards (B: Jan 15 1954 – Témiscaming Québec, D: Nov 18 2014 – Témiscaming, Québec) m.  Mona Lamothe (B: Jan 20 1956 – Bonfiled Ontario, D: —-)


ELEVENTH Generation

MOI – Tina Rose Richards


I found this helpful when trying to better understand the difference between the Quakers, the Pilgrims and the Puritans.

Pilgrims: A small group of people arrived in the New World from England on a ship named the Mayflower. They landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts. Back in England, everyone had to belong to the Church of England. The Pilgrims did not want to belong to the Church of England. They were seeking religious freedom from the Church of England. 

Puritans: About 10 years later, a large group of people called the Puritans arrived in the New World, also from England. They believed everyone should belong to the Church of England or be punished. They left England and came to the New World because they believed the Church of England needed to be purified. In their opinion, the Church was embracing too many Catholic beliefs. They settled in Boston. They practiced religious intolerance. They wanted to be part of the Church of England, but they wanted the church’s beliefs purified. 

Alike: Both groups spoke English. Both groups arrived from England at about the same time. Both groups thought of themselves as Englishmen and were loyal to the King. Both groups came to the New World because of their disagreement with the Church of England.

Quakers: There was another religious group in the colonies called the Quakers. They also disagreed with the Church of England. Many Quakers left England for the New World. They settled in Pennsylvania in the 1600s. There, they practiced religious freedom for everyone. People were free to believe what they wanted and talk to God in their own way. People from all over Europe poured into their communities, seeking religious freedom. The Quakers believed that violence was not the way to solve problems. The Quakers were known as “The Friends”.

 

Namaste

T xo

Featured Image Photo Cred: Map of Salem Village in 1692 physical features, and the dwellings of prominent and important residents in Salem during 1692.

‘Napalm Girl’: The Day I Met Kim Phúc

The photograph is one of the most well known photographs of this era.  That of a little girl fleeing the horror –  she is running naked on a road after being severely burned by the South Vietnamese napalm attack.  On June 8, 1972, Kim’s village of Trang Bang came under attack by South Vietnamese planes, which mistakenly dropped napalm on a Buddhist pagoda in an area where the North Vietnamese were infiltrating.

This photo (feature image credit: AP Photographer Nick Ut) was featured on the front page of The New York Times the next day.

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 12.06.40 PM.png
Kim Phúc, after an aerial napalm attack on June 8, 1972. 

I  got to hear the girl in Associated Press photographer Nick Ut’s Pulitzer Prize winning photograph at a speaking engagement. Kim Phúc whose name I never knew when I saw those photos as a teen, but whose life touched so many, came to speak at my daughter’s high school, Père-René-de-Galinée in Cambridge, Ontario about her journey.

Phan Thi Kim Phúc stood on stage, at the front of the audience, near a projection screen and spoke to an intimate group of high schoolers and parents who came to hear her story of survival, tragedy, strength and perseverance.  After hearing her saga and story, I was so impressed by her courage and determination.  She talked of her struggle, her physical and emotional pain and that of forgiveness.

She spoke of how she was told that her burns were so severe that she probably would not survive; third degree burns covered half of her body. After a 14-month hospital stay and 17 surgical procedures including skin grafts, she was able to return home. It was only after treatment at a renown special clinic in Ludwigshafen, Germany, in 1982, that Kim was able to properly move again.

She tells us that the other children in the photo running with her are her brothers and cousins.  Phan Thanh Tam her younger brother, lost an eye.  Phan Thanh Phúc, her youngest brother and Kim’s cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. Behind them are soldiers of the Vietnam Army 25th Division.

She also tells us that they were burning and that she thought her clothes were hanging off of her only to realize that it was her flesh falling and bouncing off her back, arms and legs as she ran.  She spoke of the tremendous amount of pain.  “The pain was unbelievable. I would pass out”.  Napalm burns at eight hundred to twelve hundred Celsius and it burns deep under the skin.

She talked about her skin being so tight on her body and that she found some relief in the shower. She talked about how she wanted to wear short sleeve blouses like other girls and that she thought she would never have a boyfriend.

I recall her talking about being accepted to medical school in Saigon.  Her government thought she should be a war symbol for the State and said that they tried to control her.  She went to Cuba in 1986 to study and where she remained for 6 years, all the while being watched by the gov’t, she was never free and compared herself to a bird in a cage who longed for freedom.

While studying in Cuba, she met Bui Huy Toan (Tom). In 1992 they married.  They honeymooned in Moscow.  They made a secret plan to defect. Friends said it was possible to defect on the return flight to Cuba from Moscow in Gander, Newfoundland. They hid in the bathroom during a routine refuelling stop in Gander, and were granted political asylum to remain in Canada.  They had nothing, all of their luggage continued on the plane to Cuba, she only had a purse and camera, but she was free.

Screen Shot 2017-06-19 at 6.53.55 PMShe spoke of forgiveness and of releasing the anger/emotional pain.  In the article The Story Of Kim Phuc, Napalm and Vietnam by Roy Berger, October 25 2015, she is quoted as saying “ … before you can have hope you have to forgive. Love your enemies. Bless them” and “I cannot hold hatred in my heart. Free from hatred. I forgive. I do not forget”. That is very much what she expressed at her speaking engagement to us, in Cambridge.

With this the crowd comes to its feet in applause.  What an amazing story, and what an amazing woman! I am so happy that I got to hear and meet this most courageous woman, her story was truly inspiring!

Footnote:  Kim started the Kim Foundation International as a way for her to give something back in return for all the help she received. It also provides a means for her to promote peace and forgiveness.

IMG_0044
The pic I took of Kim’s WELCOME to PRDG (sorry, it’s cut off)

Namaste

T xo

I Was In An Earthquake: Dominican Republic 2003

In September of 2003, we decided to take a family vacation to the Dominican Republic.  It was our 1st destination family trip ever.   I was excited for a week of relaxing, switching off from work, and enjoying the sand and sun.  The kids were extra excited as they had never been anywhere except for Quebec to camp at my dad’s trailer.   We stayed at the Occidental Allegro Playa Dorada in Puerto Plata.  The week long, all inclusive, vacation was from September 21 to September 28, 2003.

It was a long day, we were up at 3:00 A.M. to get to Pearson International Airport in Toronto for our 6:00 A.M departure.  After arriving in the DR, spending the day exploring the grounds, having dinner and enjoying the nightly entertainment, we decided it was time to call it a day. We were officially zonked after an exciting first day of fun in the sun!

Quoting from my scrapbook of 14 years ago:

“I went to bed around 11:15 PM, after all it was a long 1st day and we were up at 3:00 A.M. At around 12:45 A.M. I heard what sounded like a huge jetliner coming toward the hotel.  It was a loud unforgettable roar/rumble.  As I was getting up to look out the patio doors (to my left), the hotel began shaking.  Items in the bathroom, and on the counter were falling to the ground, the toilet slammed shut, the bed was rolling away from the wall.  While the earth was shaking, the power went out … it was pitch black”.

I was in bed reading for a while and had just taken off my glasses and set them on the floor beside the bed and shut my eyes.  It hadn’t been more than 10 minutes or so when I heard the rumble, it was like nothing I had heard before, all I can do to describe it is liken it to the loud thunder of an airplane that is really close ….  like right overhead.  I actually thought that a plane could have been ditching into the Atlantic because we were close to the airport and it was THAT LOUD!  That’s why I got up to look out the patio doors.  The shaking went on for a whole 40 seconds!  The floor shook hard as I tried to stand. A surge threw me backward. I was the only one awake before the quake hit.  Everyone else was sleeping.  They eventually woke with all of the ruckus.  I couldn’t work out in my mind what was happening at first, but, eventually I knew we had to get to a doorway.  By that time, the ferocious shaking had stopped and all of the noise and movement was replaced by an eerie silence.

I ran to the door of the room to see what was going on, I opened it … blackness.  Eventually the emergency lighting came on.  I called the front desk, and in my broken Spanish asked “tierra tiembla?” (it’s a good thing French is very similar to Spanish), the front desk clerk’s only response was “si”.

Shaken (because the last thing you expect to be in while you’re on vacation is to be in an earthquake),  we got out of our jammies, locked up our valuables (I have to admit, we did grab the bottle of rum though) and headed toward the front lobby.  Some people stayed in their rooms, but my gut instinct was to go down to get off of the second floor and out of the room because we didn’t know the extent of the damage to the hotel or how big the initial aftershock would be.  Some people were gathered by the “action” pool (not to be confused with the “quiet” pool because there is one)  so we went there, grabbed some chairs and made our way to the lobby exit.

It was a strange atmosphere; everyone crowded there at 1:00 in the morning’ish, nervously chatting and laughing. The 1st aftershock hit at around 1:06 A.M.  The 2nd one, which felt a bit stronger, hit at 1:30 A.M.  We were sitting in our plastic chairs which we borrowed from the pool deck.  They swayed as the earth rumbled, pieces of the clay tile fell from the roof, the awning crumpled and frightened tourists and hotel staff ooooh’ed as the ground moved under our feet.  I have to admit, it’s a really, really, really weird feeling when the earth rumbles below you; all I could imagine was a crack opening up beneath us and being swallowed.

FullSizeRender 5 11.00.48 PM.jpg

FullSizeRender 9 11.00.42 PM.jpg

We weren’t given much information other than most of the Northern Coast was without power.  No one knew the magnitude nor where the epicentre was at this point.   To me being me, these were vital statistics – I’m thinking “I NEED to know where the epicentre is”.  Is it in the mountain range behind me or in front of me in the ocean?  It matters!”  I don’t think anyone other than myself was worried about the possibility of a tsunami!  I don’t know if watching too much NatGeo is a blessing or a curse.

FullSizeRender 10 11.00.36 PM.jpg
Poor Cassandra,all of the rocking and rolling made her sick to her stomach.  Meanwhile, Emma proudly shows off a 5 cent peso she found during all of the ruckus!

I decided to make a call back home to Canada and spoke with my best friend, at the time, Miranda.  I told her what had transpired and to look online for information and that I’d call her back, because truthfully, I thought she’d probably get information faster back home than we would there in the DR.

After waiting a while for instructions and as the aftershocks continued throughout the night (although milder),  we were told that we’d have to spend the night outside, because the hotel had to be cleared for re-entry by the military to ensure it was safe for we tourists. So, we gathered up some chaise lounges and some blankets and slept under the stars. That wouldn’t have been half bad save for the 1000’s of mosquitoes and mosquito bites we endured!   The poor kids were covered head to toe in bites!  At around 7:30 A.M. we decided to go back our room and tried to get a bit more rest before starting our 1st full day.

FullSizeRender 13.jpg
You’ll note the mountain range in the backdrop of the photo I took

Later that morning, I asked our Air Transat Rep, Freddie, what the scoop was.  He explained that the quake had caused an extensive amount of damage in town to the homes, structures and roads.  He explained that the epicentre was near a mountain range, behind the hotel, about 6 miles south of Puerto Plata.  The mountain range is the biggest mountain system in the DR and connects all of the Caribbean islands, including the lesser Antilles. There are two major fault lines that run through the island – The North Hispaniola Trench and The Septentrional Fault Zone, both of which are active.

The damage to the hotel was minimal; some cracks in the walls, broken roof and floor tiles but otherwise not too much else.  They obviously build them sturdy since they’re ocean front and are susceptible to hurricanes.  The water that day was dark and murky from being churned the night before.

I had asked our Air Transat Rep if he wouldn’t mind getting me a local paper to bring home.

FullSizeRender 3 11.00.44 PM

FullSizeRender 2 11.00.50 PM.jpg

FullSizeRender 4 11.00.54 PM

I asked Freddie how his home made out, not good.  It had all but nearly collapsed and his belongings ruined.  It was much the same for most of the staff at the hotel that we had befriended.  To think that they had ensured all of that just a few hours earlier and still came to work in the morning.

Turns out the earthquake was a strong 6.5 on the Richter Scale and was felt over most of the country and caused significant damage in the cities of Puerto Plata and Santiago.  It was felt as far as Port-au-Prince, Haiti and even Puerto Rico some 220 miles East.  The 1st aftershock we felt measured 4.1 and the 2nd which I said felt stronger, it was, it measured 5.1.

The Richter scale:

Average effect of a 6.0 – 6.9 magnitude earthquake:   Damage to a moderate number of well-built structures in populated areas. Earthquake-resistant structures survive with slight to moderate damage. Poorly designed structures receive moderate to severe damage. Felt in wider areas; up to hundreds of miles/kilometres from the epicentre. Strong to violent shaking in epicentral area.

The first signs of damage that the quake had caused was the first time we left the resort to go horseback riding on the mountain.

Other than the odd aftershock or 20 (actually I just verified online that there were over 200 aftershocks in the days following this quake!), the rest of the week was awesome.  The sun was out, the weather was gorgeous and the water was warm.  The kids had a blast horse back riding, participating in Kids Club, mini disco, swimming in the ocean and making new friends.

Here are the last 2 pages of my scrapbook, (I was big into scrapbooking back then), which documents our departure day.

FullSizeRender 11 11.00.38 PM.jpg

FullSizeRender 12.jpg

Some people have asked me “what does it feel like to be in an earthquake?”.  If you’ve never experienced one, it’s hard to imagine the ground moving, and you moving along with it.  It’s a very unusual sensation that isn’t easy to describe.    

Looking back, now that we are safe obviously, it’s a cool experience that we get to share.  I can also now take in, the extent of the damage that this quake actually caused.

Take in the entry in the graph below “09/22/2003 – Puerto Plata, Santiago, magnitude 6.4, 36 km, deaths 3” – but look at the total damage graph!  The most damage caused by an earthquake to date in the DR.  Also, I note that for some reason it was downgraded to a 6.4 from a 6.5.

Screen Shot 2017-06-10 at 8.52.57 PM.png

I’ll chop that one up for the books that’s for sure!

Namaste

T xo

The Mitchell-Hedges Crystal Skull: I Saw It Up Close & Personal

Looking back at events in your life now you can gain a whole new appreciation and sense of awe of things that you didn’t truly understand back in the day.

We had a split class when I was in the 7th grade, our class was made up of grades 7/8.  I went to a French elementary school in Kitchener Ontario.  We were tasked with a project and presentation (great, my fave public speaking!). I couldn’t even begin to tell you what my project was on to be honest, nor can I tell you anything about any others – but, ONE stood out and something about it to this day still fascinates me!

Now my memory may be a bit sketchy because that would have been in about 1987, 30 years ago, so I am going to back up my story with some (online) facts.  For her presentation, Genevieve Lambert (who was in grade 8, I was in Grade 7), brought in a guest.  This lady with whitish hair stood there and told of the day she found a crystal skull in Belize while on an expedition with her father.  The crystal skull stood alone, on a desk, in front of her on a black velour type blanket as she explained the day she found it, what meaning it is said to have as well as its powers.   This is another one of those “I wish I could go back in time moments”.  This is the kind of stuff that fascinates me … history, exploration, mysterious artifacts which are believed to possess mystical powers …

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 12.19.09 PM.pngOf all of the crystal skulls, the Mitchell-Hedges skull is probably the most famous. The skull was allegedly discovered in the 1924 (or 1925/1926/1927 her account of dates vary), by Anna, who was the the adopted daughter of a British adventurer and traveler Frederick Mitchell-Hedges. Anna claims that she found the skull beneath the altar of a Mayan temple in Lubaantun, a ruined city in Belize, on her 17th birthday.  The city was rediscovered in 1924 by her father, Frederick,  who is said to have inspired the well known character, Indiana Jones.

The skull is one of 13 such crystal skulls apparently discovered in Mayan and Aztec ruins. The Lubaantun skull, however, is remarkable for the clarity of the crystal and the skill and detail of the carving. Many believe the skulls have special abilities, such as aiding psychic abilities, healing the sick—or even power over death. The skull was rumoured to have supernatural powers and many who had spent time alone with it described a glowing aura and said bizarre filmic images appeared inside it.

Anna inherited the skull from her father upon his death in 1959. She toured with it and Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 6.25.38 PM.pnggave many talks/interviews. Now deceased, Anna Mitchell-Hedges had the skull to her death, though it was mostly kept locked away in a bank vault. Anna moved away from her Kitchener home and stayed with friends in the United States until she passed away.

After the presentation, we were given the opportunity to get up close up and touch it – it was so pretty!  It looked anatomically correct, pure, clean, clear – like a  beautiful skull of glass or ice.  In reality the skull is made of solid crystal quartz.  I’m sure Genevieve got an A+ on that project, and the years went on.  I hadn’t thought much of the crystal skull, then in about 2014 I was binging on some National Geographic (Ep: Crystal Skulls) and on came the Mitchell-Hedges skull!  Naturally I watched it and reminisced about my little encounter with it.  “How cool” I thought to myself “I actually got to see it in real life”. 

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 12.22.45 PM
Anna Mitchell-Hedges, pictured in 2005, claims to have found this crystal skull in Belize during her father’s 1924 search for the lost city of Atlantis.  (MATHEW MCCARTHY / KITCHENER-WATERLOO RECORD FILE PHOTO)  

Then, just yesterday, I was watching an episode of Portal to the Unknown (S1: Ep 10, Mysteries From the Past), up comes a segment on …. you guessed it, the Mitchell-Hedges crystal skull.

Perhaps because of its popularity, the authenticity of Mitchell-Hedges Crystal Skull is often challenged. There are two sides of the coin.  To crystal skull devotees they are real and hold powers and then there are others who believe that this whole find was just an elaborate hoax.  People claimed that the skulls possessed supernatural powers. Science has debunked these claims, but they still persist.

Either way you choose to believe – you have to admit, it still has a degree of intrigue.  In fact, they got a boost in 2008 with the release of the action-adventure sequel Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull – the 4th instalment in the action/adventure franchise, revolving around a fictional story on crystal skulls, specifically mentioning the Mitchell-Hedges skull.

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 7.27.02 PM.png

Anna Mitchell-Hedges died on April 11, 2007 at the age of 100.  To her death, she never once denied the story of how she found the skull.  As for me, I’m just happy to have seen my little piece of history;  when she came to a little Franco-Ontario elementary school in Kitchener, Ontario and showed her skull to 20 students.

PS: I have sent a message to Genevieve to see if she has any photos from the day Anna came to school.  If she responds and she has some, I’ll add them.

Namaste

T xo

On Genealogy: Story of Pte. Émile Lamothe

Genealogy story #4 features my Great Grand Father, Émile Lamothe, whom I called Grand-Pépère Lamothe.  I figured since my last two blogs featured the other Veterans in my family, that I’d continue on that note.

Cleophas Émile Lamothe was born on June 10, 1897, in Bonfield, Ontario to Marie Louise Charron, age 38, and Joseph Magloire Lamothe, age 42.  For those of you who don’t know where Bonfield is (and I don’t blame you, I’d actually be more surprised if you actually knew where it was), it’s a small township in Northeastern Ontario, located on the north shore of Lake Nosbonsing in Nipissing District.

Émile enlisted on May 13 1918 to the 1st Depot Batallion, 1st Central Ontario Regiment. Regimental #3037591.

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 11.53.15 PMThere was some question as to whether he volunteered or whether he was drafted.  So, I did some research – turns out volunteers for the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) were questioned at the place of enlistment to complete the two-sided Attestation papers which included the recruit’s name and address, next-of-kin, date and place of birth, occupation, previous military service, and distinguishing physical characteristics. Recruits were asked to sign their Attestation papers, indicating their willingness to serve overseas. By contrast, men who were drafted into the CEF under the provisions of the Military Service Act (1917) completed a far simpler one-sided form which included their name, date of recruitment, and compliance with requirements for registration.  Having reviewed his Attestation Papers/Particulars of Recruit – I was able to deduct that Grand-Pépère volunteered his services.

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.59.58 PMÉmile was short in stature, only 5’2.5″ and was 20 years and 11 months old when he enlisted.  He was noted as being single and a Farmer.  He was listed a Class One, Category A2.

Assessments were made by medical officers as to the suitability of men to perform military duties. A system of lettering and numbering was devised to enable a mans abilities to be quickly noted. Class One meant he was single and Category A meant that he was able to march, see to shoot, hear well and stand active service conditions.  The 2 meant that he was fit for dispatching overseas as regards to physical and mental health but required training.

The other thing I wanted to investigate further was  the Depot Battalion.  At first I had no idea what a Depot Battalion even was.  It turns out that in 1917-1918, when it was no longer possible to recruit enough men for infantry battalions, depot battalions were organized in Canada to obtain personnel who would then be sent to the Canadian Reserve Battalions in England.

Émile was initially part of the 1st Depot Battalion, 1st Central Ontario Regiment.  What I have been able to find out so far is that it was authorized by General Order 89 of   September 1 1917 (see below) and by General Order 57 of 15 April 1918.  They were to reinforce the 4th, 19th, 123rd and 208th Battalions through the 3rd Canadian Reserve Battalion.  They were commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel B. H. Belson.

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 10.45.07 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-31 at 10.48.29 PM.png

His military records are quite scant to be honest and contain only about 15 documents in total.  So I’m not able to get a really good idea of what he did in The Great War or even where he was posted, not even his position is noted in his records!   All I know thus far is that on August 20 1918 he TOS (took on strength) at Bramshott Military Camp.

I don’t have his regiment’s war diaries and mobilization accounts – I will have to request them in person, but I believe I have found the reference to them and can find them at the Canadian National Archives when I go to Ottawa later this month.  However, there’s a snag – I see from his personal file that he’s noted under 3 separate regiments – 1st Depot Battalion, 1st Central Regiment, then the 1st Depot Battalion, 2nd Quebec Regiment and 1st Depot Battalion 10th Canadian Reserve Battalion.  But, I cannot decipher when he was SOS from one and TOS with another.  This is important for tracking his movement in the war diaries.

June 20 2017 Update:  Spent the day at the National Archives of Canada today.  The assistant working at the genealogy desk provided me with some information I had been seeking.  She said that as part of a depot battalion and because we can only find him in England – that he likely did not see action.  He would have been training and keeping in shape over his time in one of the military camps, in the event that he was called up to infantry for one of the battalions they were backing up.  She further added that there are not likely war diaries for depot battalions, but if there was they would not be very interesting, but that I could check the records anyway.  

 

All WWI military records are available online, so I was able to access his WWI Canadian Expeditionary Force Personnel File via Ancestry.ca (the site I am doing my family tree on).  You can also access them through the archives website.

I am just now taking in that these documents are 100 years old, I am going to post as many documents as I possibly can!


Military Records Summary

May 13 1918:  Attested at North Bay, Ontario

July 21 1918: Embarked at Québec

August 8 1918:  Arrived London, England via the S.S. Somali – she was built in 1901 by Caird & Company Greenock and served as a troop carrier in WWI

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.40.32 PM
📷: 1st August 1914  – Serving as a Hospital ship

August 20 1918: TOS (took on strength) at Bramshott a.k.a. Bramshott Military Camp, which was a temporary army camp set up on Bramshott Common, Hampshire, England during WWI. Bramshott was one of three facilities in the Aldershot Command area established by the Canadian Army. The permanent facility on both occasions was at the British Army’s Bordon Military Camp. Bramshott was one of two temporary camps set-up for additional accommodation in the lead-up to D-Day, along with Witley Camp.

November 11, 1918 – WWI ends – Armistice

Feb 19 1919:  In Ripon he was admonished and condemned to pay 1/9.5 (confirmed as 1 pound, 9 schillings, 5 pence) for losing 1 scrubber (??? What kind of post did he after the war ended that he would have that he lost a scrubber?  Did he work in a mess hall?  Did he work in a medical unit? Was it for scrubbing his boots?)  The only notation I’ve found that can be somewhat related to war is a breathing apparatus that absorbs the carbon dioxide . But I don’t think that would be it because this has specifically to do with diving.  

June 20 2017 Update:  Genealogy Assistant at National Archives advised that he literally lost a “scrubber” for cleaning.  The reason she believes this is that he was there well after the war ended and was likely involved in clean up tasks.  Given the price he was penalized to pay, she thinks it was likely a long handled scrubber.

June 14 1919: SOS (struck off strength) at Ripon – was now a part of the 10th Reserve Battalion.  He was likely transferred to this Battalion as the other battalions he was part of demobilized and returned home.

Belgic4th-bJune 23 1919:  Embarked at Liverpool on the SS Belgic. The White Star Line vessel was to be named Ceric & intended to replace Titanic in 1914. The outbreak of WWI changed all of that.  During construction, White Star decided to go with the name of Belgic IV. She was launched in Jan 1914, but was not yet completed when WWI  began later that year and the work was stopped. Belgic IV  was eventually completed in 1917, but as a troop transport and freighter rather than the passenger liner she was designed to be.

July 1 1919:  Disembarked in Halifax, NS

July 3 1919:  Discharged due to Demobilization

QUESTION:  DOES ANYONE KNOW WHY HE WOULD HAVE STAYED IN ENGLAND AS LONG AS HE DID  AFTER THE WAR HAD ENDED?

June 20 2017 Update:  While at the Canadian Archives the genealogy lady informed me that some of the troops had to stay overseas longer to clean up and pack up.  Not everyone was able to go home right after Armistice, that AND there were only a limited supply of troop ships, so everyone had to take their turns.  The sick, injured, infirmed were sent home first.  The abled bodied men, were left to clean.

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.01.49 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 9.19.20 PM.png

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.33.59 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.02.12 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 8.07.10 PM

Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 12.04.57 AM

After being discharged from the military he returned to Bonfield.  He married Marcella Houle on September 27, 1927. They had three children (Thelma, Clifford and Edward) during their marriage.

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 11.06.57 PM
Record of their marriage in the Église de Sainte-Bernadette Registry in Bonfield, ON

When I was young we’d drive up to visit them from Kitchener, it was about a 5-6 hour drive.   They lived at 217 Yonge Street.  I haven’t been there since 1993 (the day of Grand-Mémère Lamothe’s funeral) and the house has long been sold.   I remember it was a white and light green house, with a large wrap around veranda.  I always thought the house was cool and creepy at the same time, because it was so old. It was Grand-Mémère Lamothe’s parents place – she was born there.  When you’d walk in, you’d immediately walk into the living room (to the left) and the stair case to go upstairs was  to your right, it had a white railing.  I remember Grand-Mémère rocking away in her chrome glider , by the window, watching her shows.

The room immediately to the right when you walked in the front door used to be a parlour and as a child that totally creeped me when out they told me what it had been used for, but, that was in the days well before funeral parlours. Nonetheless, I could always envision dead people in there.  I remember they’d put their Christmas tree up in there and that’s where the whole lot of us would open gifts before/after midnight mass at St. Bernadette’s.

When you walked toward the back of the house from the entrance, I recall there being a long dining table before you stepped through a single door to the kitchen.  Just before you entered the kitchen (on the right hand side) there was a cabinet, that’s where Grand-Mémère would hide all of the goodies – and where I may or may not have snuck a few extra pieces of licorice.   The kitchen must have been to be an addition,  I’m sure of it.  It was big (or seemed big for a 12 year old) and filled with white cabinets.  There was a kitchen table in there with a bench, and on the back wall was a picture of The Last Supper.  They never had a bath tub or shower in the house, we’d have to bathe in the kitchen sink.

Grand-Mémère would get up very early in the mornings – and when we’d come down she’d make us peach or maple soupan (French slang for porridge) and the best Map-O-Spread toasts.

Photos above:

  • Left  – “The cousins” (Mona, Darlene and Doreen) and their children (Mona: Tina & Darryl), (Darlene: Lisa, Francine & Stephanie), (Doreen: Sylvie, Ginette and Stephanie).  Note the green colour of the house and the laundry station.
  • Top Right – “June 1984” – Mom Mona, Me, Darryl, Grand-Pépère and Grand-Mémère and Pépère.  Note the white cabinets!
  • Bottom Right – “Grand-Pépère’s 87th Birthday” at Ma Tante Thelma and Uncle Rene’s in Bonfield.

There were two doors in the kitchen – one exiting to the veranda toward the front and the other going out the the old step up laundry washing area/ line they had (see photo above).  They never owned a dryer. Grand-Mémère did all of the laundry by hand and hung it out back on the line to dry.  Now by hand I mean, she had an old fashioned washing machine where you would wash it and then you had to take the piece of clothes and put it in a wringer and it would fall in a big bucket of clean cool water to rinse, then she would take it out of the rinse water and wring it again – so to me that is still by hand!

Coming from a generation that they did, and the house sourcing from a well, I’m sure they were afraid of the well running dry – at night time we had a large marmite (pot) at the top of the stairs to pee in, if we had to go.  Grand-Mémère would empty it when she got up in the morning.  I also remember that the rooms didn’t have doors, they had curtains – and that there were 3 bedrooms plus theirs which was at the front of the house.   Come to think of it, I don’t think I was ever in their room.

FullSizeRender 7 2
At Grand-Pépère & Grand-Mémère Lamothe’s in Bonfield, 1981

I remember Grand-Pépère fiddling around in the back tool shed.  I remember going in there as a child and thinking “wow this place is filled with really cool old junk”. 

They had a garden out back and had a rain barrel that they’d collect water in to water their garden.

I remember the house wasn’t too far from the train tracks cause I would hear it whistling at night time.

It’s when you sit here and reminisce on your life that you wish you had the thirst for knowledge then like you do now.  The things I would love to have asked Grand-Pépère;  from 1897 to 1992 he must have seen soooo many crazy things!  He went from a seeing the first Ford Model T to a Lamborghini.  He went from coal and wood fires to electricity, telephones and tv’s all during HIS LIFETIME.  He saw two World Wars and was at one of them.  Oh the stories  Grand-Pépère would have told me as he puffed on his pipe and  sat on the front veranda.

Emile Lamothe died on April 17, 1992, in his hometown at the age of 94.

Screen Shot 2017-05-28 at 11.10.03 PM

Namaste

T xo