On Genealogy: The Loyalist, The Spy and The American Revolution

I took a bit of a break from my close relatives because I found another interesting leaf hint and decided to follow it.  I saw this one before, but, I felt I would have to do a lot of research so I passed.  Then I came across something else on the same person and decided to go with it … it might be interesting — and it was.

For this story, you’ll have to put on your history caps and go with me all the way back to the American Revolution.  Now, I am Canadian – I haven’t studied American history in depth but we did certainly cover it in grade 11 world history.

The American Revolution (1775-83) which is also referred to as the American Revolutionary War OR the U.S. War of Independence was essentially a civil war based on who would rule in the Thirteen Colonies. France entered the American Revolution on the side of the colonists in 1778, turning what had essentially been a civil war into an international conflict. After French assistance helped the Continental Army force the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, the Americans had effectively won their independence, though fighting would not formally end until 1783  (http://www.history.com/topics/american-revolution/american-revolution-history).

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My Connection to The Loyalist and The Spy

Edward Hicks Sr. + Elvina Cornell (Gen 6)

See below for story of Edward Hicks – The Loyalist

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Joseph Hicks + Elizabeth Loose (Gen 5)

( Joseph Hicks was born in  1767 in Albany, NY, and died in 1815 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada) 

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U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-1989 New York
Schenectady
Schenectady Marriages, Vol 5, Book 45

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Sarah Hicks + Roger Moore (Gen 4)

Olive Moore + Ambrose Richards (Gen 3)

George Richards + Cecilia McKenzie  (Gen 4)

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Ambrose Richards + Angelina Mullin (Gen 3)

Benjamin Richards + Sarah Lee (Gen 2)

Patrick Richards + Mona Lamothe (Gen 1)

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MOI

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More About Edward Hicks Sr. My 6x Great Grand Father – The Loyalist

Edward Hicks was born on May 2, 1736, in Suffolk, New York, USA.

Edward married Elizabeth Elvina Levina Cornell in 1758 at the age of 22 in New York.  Elizabeth is the daughter of Samuel Mott Cornell and Hannah Cornwall.

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1758 – marriage between Edward & Elvina


Children of Edward and Elvina:
1 – 1759 his son Benjamin Hicks was born in Long Island, NY, died in 1835 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada.
2 – 1760 his son Edward (The Spy) Hicks was born in Albany, NY, died in 1832 in Marysburgh, Prince Edward, Ontario, Canada.
3 – 1762 his daughter Mary Hicks was born in Albany, New York, died in 1804 in Athens, Leeds, Ontario, Canada
4 – 1765 his son David Hicks was born in Albany New York.
5 – 1767 his son Joseph Hicks was born in Albany, NY, and died in 1815 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada.
6 – 1769 his son Daniel Hicks was born in Albany, NY. and died in 1821 in Hallowell, Ontario, Canada.
7 -1771 his daughter Elizabeth Hicks was born in Albany, NY. her death was in 1807.
8 -1774 his son Joshua Hicks was born in Sugar Run, Bradford Cty, PA., died in 1838 in Marysburgh, Prince Edwards, Ontario, Canada.

He was a member of the Society of Friends.

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U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935

—– Edward Hicks was an entrepeneur who not only settled on the frontier, but was also actively involved in organizing settlements in the frontier. The Hicks’ had 600 acres of frontier lands on the Susquehannah.  When the lands were laid out in 1774 and subsequently settled in 1775, he was one of the principle organizers, becoming in the process the first white settler in Wilmot Township, Bradbury County PA.

—–There is also evidence that Edward developed land in New York, especially with George Hicks in that part of New York which ultimately became part of New Hampshire. He may have done this also around Dutchess County.  The Susquehannah lands were part of the Connecticut and Pennsylvania lands settlement. The indications are that those enterprises in which Edward Hicks was involved were on a very large scale.

—-There is much debate on who Edward’s parents are.  The one I’ve seen online from a John Hicks – is that he is a descendant of Thomas Hicks.  How does an ordinary farm boy learn to do this all of this development? From whence the inspiration? It would certainly help if your grandfather were Thomas Hicks, land developer and Judge, whose activities in developing vast acreages of land are well documented. Thomas of course was Isaac’s father and this activity of Edward, so resembles that of Thomas Hicks.

—- We do know that he took his entire family including his wife Levina and eight children into the Pennsylvania wilderness in 1775, built a home and cleared land, and fed and clothed them and all of them survived.

—–In about March of 1777, before the breakup of the ice in the Susquehannah he and his two oldest sons joined with other loyalists along the river to travel from their homestead at the mouth of the Sugar Run (across from present day Wyalusing PA) with horses to Fort Niagara (Near present day Lewiston NY).

—–At the end of the summer’s campaign the Susquehannah men in Butler’s Rangers received permission to return to the Susquehannah to evacuate their families. Edward Hicks was among these and was captured by the Westmoreland militia as he was nearing home in late December 1777 or early January 1778. He remained in custody until his death in 1778 or 1779. There are accounts of both years. I am inclined to accept 1778 as it appears that Levina remarried in September of 1779.

—–Before the War, Edward Hicks’s home was known to be a safe house for loyalists to King George (Tories) as they made their way from Philadelphia into the interior, even to the Ohio valley. George Washington was not very pleased about this.

—–When in 1779 General Sullivan was ordered to take an army of 10,000 men up the Susquehannah to destroy the Indian villages and any remants of the Tories and their homesteads he is said to have stopped outside of Wyalusing in mid September. There is no doubt that the Hicks homestead received a special inspection and treatment at that time.

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Screen Shot 2018-02-10 at 6.56.10 PMI was able to locate an extract of their companies.

Per the Revolutionary War Records Edwd Hicks Senr, was listed as a Private paid  £ 30.8 at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 204 days of service from Dec 25 1777 to October 24 1778 (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778).

Benjamin Hicks was listed as a Private in Captain William Caldwell’s Company of Butler’s Rangers paid £30.8 at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 304 days of service from 25 Dec 1777 to 24 Oct 1778. (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778)

Edwd Hicks Junr, Private, taken on the Susquehana Jany 1778, named in “A List of Persons in the hands of the Congress belonging to the Corps of Rangers, Royalists & their Families”.  He was listed in Private Captain William Caldwell’s Coy of Butler’s Rangers and paid at the rate of 2 shillings per day for 304 days of service from December 25 1777 to 1778 (Pay Rolls of Butler’s Rangers 1777-1778).  He was taken prisoner 3rd of January 1778, returned and present at Muster 5th November 1779  £377.3 (Pay to Rangers taken prisoner and casualties).

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Butler’s Rangers –  Walter Butler’s Coy.

[Extract]

We the undermentioned Commissioned & non Commissioned Officers & Privates of Captain Walter BUTLER’s Company of Rangers do acknowledge to have received from John BUTLER Esqr. Major Commandant of the Corps of Rangers the full amount of our Pay from 24th December 1777 to 24th October 1778 inclusive.

commencing Ending
Captain Walter BUTLER 25 Decr. 1777 24 Octr. 1778
1st Lieutenant Andrew THOMPSON      do      do
2d Lieutenant Philip FREY      do 21 May 1778
Sgt Moses MOUNTAIN      do 24 Octr. 1778
Sgt Randle McDANNEL      do      do
Sgt Lewis MABEE      do      do
Cpl Henry PUTNAM      do      do
Cpl Thomas McCORMICK 25 June 1778      do
Cpl Jacob FREDERICK 25 Decr. 1777      do
Peter MILLER      do      do
Harmanus HOUSE      do      do
John SMYTH      do      do
Michael MORIN      do      do
John LORD      do      do
Hugh JONES      do      do
George HOUSE      do      do
John HOUSE      do      do
John DAVIS      do      do
Joseph SIRN      do 24 June 1778
Joseph PAGE      do 24 Octr. 1778
Derck BELL      do      do
Thomas YOLE      do      do
George STEWART      do      do
Emanuel HUMFRIES      do      do
Frederick WINTER      do      do
Henry WINTER      do      do
John RICHART      do      do
Nicholas PHILIPS, Senr.      do      do
John YARNS      do      do
Adam BOWMAN, Junr.      do      do
Jacob BRUNNER      do      do
Redman BERRY      do      do
Charles ANGER      do      do
Henry WINDECKER      do      do
John YOUNGS      do      do
Thomas SILK      do      do
Jacob TAKE      do      do
John SEACORD, Senr.      do      do
John SEACORD, Junr.      do      do
Solomon SEACORD 25 Decr. 1777 24 June 1778
Stephen SEACORD      do 24 Octr. 1778
David SEACORD      do      do
Silas SEACORD      do 24 June 1778
Peter SEACORD      do 24 Octr. 1778
Jacob BOWMAN      do      do
Peter SIMMON      do      do
John PHILIPS      do      do
Jacob ENGUSH      do      do
Robert FARRINGTON      do      do
Henry SMITH      do      do
Adin SEABIE      do      do
Nicholas PHILIPS, Senr.      do      do
Conrad SILL      do      do
Joshua BEABIE      do      do
Abraham WARTMAN      do      do
Augustus ANGER      do      do
Edward HICKS, Senr.      do      do
Charles DEPUE      do      do
Thomas GRIFFIS      do      do

Great Britain, British Library, Additional Manuscripts, No. 21765, folios 44-45.

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Butler’s Rangers – Caldwell’s Coy.

[Extract]

We the undermentioned Commissioned & non Commissioned Officers & Privates of Captain William CALDWELL’s Company of Rangers do acknowledge to have received from John BUTLER Esqr. Major Commandant of a Corps of Rangers the full amount of our Pay from 24th December 1777 to 24th October 1778 inclusive.

Commencing Ending
Captain William CALDWELL 25 Decr. 1777 24 Octr. 1778
1st Lieutenant Bernard FREY      do      do
2d Lieutenant Peter HARE      do      do
Serjt. Frederick DOCKSTEDER      do      do
Serjt. Daniel YOUNG      do      do
Serjt. Joseph PETRIE      do      do
Corpl. Benjamin McKAY      do      do
Corpl. Benjamin DAVIS      do      do
Corpl. James WILSON      do      do
Henry SIMMON      do      do
Adam BOWMAN, Senr.      do      do
Isaac VOLKENBURG      do      do
John HOVER      do      do
Jacob BOWMAN, Junr.      do      do
Stephen FERRINGTON      do      do
Oldrick SHATT      do      do
George KINTNER      do      do
Robert REYNOLDS      do      do
Philip BUCH      do      do
Edward HICKS      do      do
Frederick FRANK      do      do
Frederick SMITH      do      do
Jacob HUNTINGER      do      do
Benjamin HICKS      do      do
John TOPP      do      do
John CARLOCK      do 31 July 1778
James BAKER      do 24 Octr. 1778
Henry TEAL      do 24 June 1778
John CLAUS      do 24 Octr. 1778
Frederick VANDERLIP      do      do
William QUACK      do      do
John McDONNEL      do      do
John MOSS      do      do
Peter McDONNEL      do      do
Jacob SPARBECK      do      do
John STEPHENS      do      do
William BUSH      do      do
James DAWSON      do 24 April 1778
John PARKER      do 24 Octr. 1778
David BRASS 25 Decr. 1777 24 June 1778
Adam KRYSLER      do 18 May 1778
David HOLLAND      do 31  do
Thomas BROOKS      do 24 Octr. 1778
Henry BOSS      do      do
James EMPSON      do      do
Robert CAMPBELL      do      do
James BROWN      do      do
Charles SMITH 25 June 1778      do
Abner SPENCER 25 Decr. 1777 31 May 1778
Thomas McCORMICK      do 24 June 1778
William SMITH 30  do 31 May 1778
Frederick SEGAR      do 24 Octr. 1778
Richard McGINNES      do      do
James CROWDER      do      do
Isaac CROWDER      do      do
William NEWBERRY      do 24 June 1778
John SMITH 25 June 1778 24 Octr. 1778
John TURNEY, Junr.      do      do
Pay of 3 Contingent Men 25 Decr. 1777      do
 Great Britain, British Library, Additional Manuscripts, No. 21765, folios 64-65.

He was was captured along with his son, Edward Jr, who were both sentenced to death. Edward Sr was hung in 1778 in Minisink (a town located in southwest Orange County, New York) as a traitor, but his widow and sons escaped to Canada. Details of his death cannot be proved conclusively – nor that I have found to date.  I can’t find much that they “escaped” to Canada, but it stands to reason.

Edward was later officially recognized as a U.E. Loyalist, so his widow and children were compensated for their losses with extensive land grants in Marysburg, Prince Edward Co, Ontario —- thus originating an extensive Ontario Hicks line.

Possible verification of Edward Jr’s arrest is as follows: (Hist of Kuykendall Fam, by G B Kuykendall, Kilham Stan & Prnt Co, Portland, OR, 1919, p 331 & 332) Wilhelmus Kuykendall – The next pension claim found was that of Wilhelmus Kuykendall. His application was made October 9, 1832. In his “statement” he said that he “Entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated; he resided in the town of Minisink, Orange county, and state of New York, and in 1778 went into service under Lieutenant Martyn Decker; went in pursuit of Robert Land and Edward Hix, who were sent from New York to carry dispatches to the Indians at Niagara, and captured said Land and Hix and delivered them over to Lieut. Bull, belonging to Spencer’s regiment, afterwards to General Pulaski, in New Jersey state, making the time in the last mentioned service one half month.

Rebel Court Martial of Robert Land & Edward Hicks Jr.

At a General Court Martial held at Minisink the 17th and continued by adjournment till the 19th day of March 1779 by order of Brigadier General Hand.

Lieut. Colonel Lindsley, President
Major Burchardt, German Regt.     Major Lamagne, Armands Corps
Captn. Shots, Indept. Corps     Captn. Selen, Indept. Corps
Captn. Brodderick,
Col. Spencers Regt.
    Captn. Weatherby,
Spencers Regt.
Captn. Boyer, Germn. Regt.     Captn. Balsar, Germn. Regt.
Lt. Young, Col. Spencers Regt.     Lt. Orr, Col. Spencers Regt.
Ensn. Clegner, Germn. Regt.     Ensn. Irvendover, Germn. Regt.
The Members being present and duly Sworn and Adjt. Bonnel of Col. Spencers Regt. acting as Judge Advocate and Prosecuting in behalf of the United States being also Sworn the Court proceed to Business.

Prisoner        Robert LAND brought before the Court charged with being a Spy and carrying Intelligence to the Enemy, Pleads not Guilty.

Evidence        James Vanokee Esqr. being Sworn saith, that at the beginning of the present War, the Prisoner was suspected of being a Tory, and examined before the Northamton County Committee. That in consequence of his swearing Allegiance to the United States he was set at Liberty.

Arthur Vantoil being sworn saith that on Thursday evening the 11th Inst. he went to Daniel Courtwrites a Neighbour of his suspecting that a number of Tories were at his House, and to see if he could get any Intelligence of them.

That when he went to the Door, he saw the Prisoner (LAND) eating Supper, as soon as LAND saw him he seized his Musket which was by his side with a Bayonet fixed. At which he, the Deponent, left the door.

He further says that Courtwright came out of the House, and he asked him if there was any news, or any Tories in his House, that he told him there was no need, neither was there any Tories in the House.

Lt. Decker being Sworn saith that the 14th Inst. he went towards Coshithton with a party of men, after a number of Tories that were on their way from New York to Niagara.

That about three OClock P.M. he fell in with them and took LAND and HICKS, he further says that LAND told him after he was made prisoner that he was going to the Enemy at Niagara.

— Adjourned till tomorrow ten O’Clock.—-

18th March        The Court met According to Adjournment.

Captn. Tyler (formerly an Inhabitant of Coshithton) being sworn saith that at the Commencement of the present war, he heard the prisoner say that he never would take up arms against the King of Britain.

That sometimes afterwards he was carried before the Committee at Peenpack and found Guilty of being an Enemy to these States, and from thence sent to a Committee in Pennsilvania to which state he belonged, for tryall, and upon his taking the Oath of Allegiance to the United States he was set at Liberty.

That immediately after that he went to the Indians; in a short time after that Returned and went to the Enemy at New York.

Captn. Tyler further says that he was sent to the Indians in a few days after Land left them, on Business to try to make peace, with them.

That the Indians told him that Land had been there and made a great complaint concerning the usage he had received from the Committee.

Captn. Tyler farther declares that a few days ago he heard LANDs Wife say that when he was searched for Letters in 1777 that he outwitted those who searched him by having a Letter concealed in his Ink Stand that was sent from General HOWE to the Commanding Officer at Niagara.

That he then told her she was as bad as her Husband and in his Opinion she had Letters from New York concealed, she declared that as God was her Judge she had not, that her Husband had him them for fear they would be found with him as he expected every Minute to be taken prisoner.

Defence        The prisoner says in his Defence that a certain Hugh JONES, John LORD and an Indian, came to his House in the Evening in April 1777.

That Jones told him that he was going to join BUTLER and BRANDT and that he intended to get the Indians to distroy the Frontiers, upon which he went with them to try to prevent their distroying the Country, on his way he met BRANDT who told him he had no Orders to distroy the Country and murder the Inhabitants except they were in arms against him, and although he was an Indian he Intended to convince the world that he was possessed with Humanity.

After that he returned Home to Coshithton where he remained, till the 21st February following and then being informed that the Indians were coming to distroy Coshithton, he went to New York to try to put a stop to their Depredations, after being there a few days was informed that the Inhabitants would kill him if he returned.

Upon which he concluded to stay in York, and immediately entered into the Kings Yard a Carpenter where he continued working till the last day February 1779.

He then left New York to go to see his Family which was about Twenty Miles west of Coshithton, and move them to Niagara.

That Genl. CLINTON who Commands the British Troops in New York desired him to carry a Letter to the commanding Officer at Niagara, which he refused.

The Genl. then desired him to inform the Commandant at Niagara, that it was his desire that the Indians should not be permitted to continue to ravage and distroy the Frontiers.

Sentence        The Court considering the Case of the prisoner, the Evidence against him, and his Defence are unanimously of Opinion, that he is Guilty of the Charges Exhibited against him, and do therefore Sentence him to suffer Death.

[signed] Eleazr. Lindsley Pres.

*** The Court Adjourn till tomorrow ten Oclock ***

19th March        The Court met according to adjournment.

Prisoner        Edward HICKS Brought before the Court charged with being a Spy, and carrying Intelligence to the Enemy Pleads not Guilty.

Evidence        Lieut. Bennet being sworn saith that about two years ago he heard the prisoner say that he would as willingly kill a Man that fought against the British Troops as kill a Dog.

Captain Spalding being Sworn saith at the Commencement of the present War he was acquainted with the prisoner, and that he had a Mind to engage in the Service of the United States, which he thinks he would have done, had he not been persuaded to the Reverse by his Father, and some other evil minded People.

Defence        The prisoner says in his Defence, that he was formerly an Inhabitant of Susquehannah.

That in April 1777 he left his Fathers House and went to Niagara in Company with about Sixty Tories where he continued about Two Months, then entered into the Batteaux Service to carry Provisions from Niagara to Oswego where he continued about Six Weeks, & upon hearing that General Washington had Issued a Proclamation Offering pardon to all those who had joined the Indians if they would Return to their Homes, he imediately set of[f] to return home, but coming in too late to receive the Benefit of the Proclamation was taken by some of the Militia and carried to Hartford in the state of Connecticut and there kept confined till Septr. 78, from thence sent to New York as a prisoner of War and Exchanged, entered into the service of the Enemy in the Commissaries Department till the last day of February 79, when he made his Escape from New York and that on his way to Niagara he was taken by a party of Militia near Coshithton the 24th Inst.

Sentence        The Court considering the Case of the Prisoner, the Evidence for and against him, and his Defence, are unanimously of Opinion that he is Guilty of being a Spy and do Sentence him to be kept in Close Confinement during the War.

Eleazr. Lindsley Pres.

Library of Congress, George Washington Papers, Series 4, Reel 56, 10 February 1779 — 25 March 1779.

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From the Quinte Branch of the UEL Assn, Newsletter for Spring 1995 (Vol.6 No.4) a page of undocumented Hicks information. The contributor was “Ealaine Lawlor”. She stated that in 1779 father Edward Hicks, and his son Edward, were captured by the Westmoreland Militia, and held at the Minisink Prison. Father was hanged outside his son’s cell, so the son plotted his escape. Feigning a stomach ailment he was let outside for some fresh air, and there he overpowered his guard, and went on an adventure to escape his captors. Eventually he made it back to British lines. Settlement

American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War were consdiered to be Loyalists. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King’s Men. When their cause was defeated, about 15% of the Loyalists (65,000–70,000 people) fled to other parts of the British Empire, to Britain itself, or to British North America (now Canada). Northern Loyalists largely migrated to Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. They called themselves United Empire Loyalists. Most were compensated with Canadian land or British cash distributed through formal claims procedures. Edward Hicks took advantage of the UEL land grant and settled in Marysburg, Prince Edward County, Ontario.

In 1789, Lord Dorchester, governor-in-chief of British North America, proclaimed that the Loyalists and their children should be allowed to add “UE” to their names, “alluding to their great principle, the Unity of Empire.” As a result, the phrase “United Empire Loyalist,” or UEL, was applied to Loyalists who migrated to Upper and Lower Canada.

In determining who among its subjects was eligible for compensation for war losses, Britain used a fairly precise definition: Loyalists were those born or living in the American colonies at the outbreak of the Revolution who rendered substantial service to the royal cause during the war, and who left the United States by the end of the war or soon after.

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We see that Edward Hicks Jr and (the rest of the family) removed to Upper Canada – Ontario.  Edward Jr is noted in the “History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)” by Wm. Caniff, M.D., Toronto: Dudley & Burns Printers, Victoria Hall, 1869 (pgs 104 and 105).

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From “History of the Settlement of Upper Canada (Ontario)” by Wm. Caniff, M.D., Toronto: Dudley & Burns Printers, Victoria Hall, 1869 (pgs 104 and 105)

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What We Know About Edward The Spy

Husband: Edward HICKS Jr. (My 6x Great Uncle)

Born: ABT 1761 at: Dutchess Co, New York.  Married: ABT 1793 at: North Marysburgh, Prince Edward County, Ont Died: 11 Nov 1832 at: N. Marysburgh Twp, Prince Edward Co, Ontario.  Father: Edward “The Loyalist” HICKS. Mother: Elvina (Levina).


Wife: Deborah PRINGLE

Born: 28 Aug 1772 at: Skenesborough, Whitehall, New York.  Died: at: Father: Sgt. Timothy PRINGLE, SR (Loyalist). Mother: Huldah WELDON.


CHILDREN

Name: John HICKS Born: ABT 1794 at: N. Marysburgh Twp, Prince Edward Co, Ontario.   Married: 1828 at: Mulmur Twp, Dufferin Co, Ont. Died: ABT 1870 at: Mulmar Twp, Dufferin Co, Ontario. Spouses: Hannah Elizabeth HYNAMAN.


Name: Edward HICKS Born: 1796 at: Ontario.  Married: at: Died: at: Spouses: Lucretia MILLER TAYLOR.


SOURCES  1) Descendants of Edward, “The Loyalist,” Hicks   2) Beecher Family Genealogy

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Land Claims

From “Second Report of the Bureau of Archives for the Province of Ontario”, 1904, whichScreen Shot 2018-02-10 at 11.37.10 PM printed many of the investigations made by the government into the claims of the Loyalists. Claim # 441, made at Montreal on 6th March, 1788 (this is a verbatim transcript photocopied by Dale Halliday at the UEL Library in Toronto): (This claim is made by Ed, Jr on behalf of his father Ed. SR)

*** Evidence on the Claim of EDWARD HICKS, late of Susquehana, now of Pensilvania Cataraqui, Bay of Quinty. (note: probably means “late of Susquehana, Pensilvania, now of Catarqui, Bay of Quinty”; Cataraqui was the old name for Kingston ON, the nearest town to Marysburgh. D.H.)

Claimt (son, Edward Jr.) Sworn: Says he was in Butlers Rangers in 1783 & sent a claim to England by Capt. Gummersal. He is a native of America. In 1775 he lived on the Susquehana with his Father. He joined the British Army in 1777 & served the War in Butlers Rangers. He now resides at Bay of Quinty. The Claim is for his Father’s Property. He died 1780 at New York & had served in Butler’s Rangers. There are 5 Boys & 2 Girls alive, all in Canada. His Mother is alive & married to Joseph Wright in the Bay of Quinty. He had 600 Acres on the Susquehana. He bought it of the Pensilvania & Connecticut Claimts. before the War. He had 25 acres cleared. He can not tell who has it now. Lost his Stock, Farming Utensils, Furniture.

Wits. WILLIAM FRANKS Sworn: Remembers Ed. Hicks Lands. He had a farm on the Susquehana. He had considerable Clearance & a pretty large Stock of Cattle. The rebels took greatest part.

Wits. G. KENTNER Sworn: Hicks deceased was always Loyal; on the same title as the others there. He had 20 acres cleared & had a good Stock of Cattle & Horses. Claimt. is a good soldier.

April 25 Edward Hicks produces a paper signed by 2 of his Brs., Danl. & Joseph, agreeing that he shd. receive what is due to them & also answering for the younger Brs. & Sisters.”

 

Namaste

T xo

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On Genealogy: My 2x Grand-Parents – Louis Allard & Eva Beaulieu

This line continues down my maternal grand-mother side.  This is the story of my great great gramma and grampa on my grandma’s dad’s side.

This is the story of Louis Napoléon Allard and Eva Beaulieu.

Louis’ Birth

Louis Napoléon Allard was born on/about November 24, 1874, in Curran, Ontario to Marie Louise Gariepy, age 20, and Hillaire Allard, age 19.

The 1901 Census indicates that his date of birth is 7 Sep 1873. However he was baptized on 24 Nov 1874 and in that day it wasn’t uncommon to be baptized the day of your birth – so I am using that date for now, until I can find concrete evidence.  Normally one wouldn’t wait over a year to have your child baptized.  


Louis’ Baptism

Paroisse St-Luc de Curran • 24 Nov 1874 • Curran, Ontario, Canada


Construction of the Canadian Pacific Railroad

In 1881, Louis was living in Prescott, Ontario when the Canadian Pacific Railroad was under construction.  When the Canadian Pacific Railway laid its first spike in Bonfield in the early 1880’s Bonfield township prospered. Recognition of Bonfield as the place where the first spike of the CPR was driven was recognized in 2002 in the Railway Hall of Fame.


Louis’ Residence

Louis lived in Prescott, Ontario, in 1881.  In the Township of Plantagenet North


Eva’s Birth

Eva Beaulieu was born on May 6, 1882, in Taunton, Massachusetts, USA, to Georgina Prêtaboire, age 27, and Napoléon Beaulieu, age 31.

Taunton is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States, located approximately 64 km south of Boston, 29 kms east of Providence, RI.

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Louis’ Residence

Louis Napoléon Allard lived in Prescott, Ontario in 1891.

He was living at home with his parents and siblings. No job noted in the census or if he was in school.

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Eva’s Death of Father

Her father Napoléon Beaulieu (1851–1889) passed away on May 6, 1889, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, at the age of 38.  Eva was 7 years old.


Eva’s Death of Mother

Her mother Georgina Prêtaboire (1855–1892) passed away on July 26, 1892, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, USA, at the age of 37.  Eva was 10 years old.


Eva’s Arrival to Canada

The 1921 census states that she immigrated to Canada in 1891 from the U.S. We know that she came back to Canada after her PARENTS died – her mother passed in 1892.  So we know that she immigrated to Canada in/about 1892 or later.

Folklore from my Mémère (her grand-daughter Desneiges Lamothe) and a handwritten letter from a relative, Yvonne Beaulieu, indicates that she was told that Eva went back to Canada with the Shanks after her parents died.  The letter also goes onto say that the family name was Hudon de Beaulieu, and that when they arrived at Ellis Island that they dropped the Hudon and so it became Beaulieu. She also states in the letter that she is unsure as to the relationship with the Shanks and why she returned with them.  She says that the Beaulieu’s immigrated to the USA during the time of the French Revolution (France: April 20, 1792 – March 25, 1802) – this is NOT fact from what I have found so far.  The facts show that the Hudon de Beaulieu’s were born in Québec, Canada – at one point they did emigrate to the U.S. but why?  What was going on in Lower Canada/USA at that time that my French 3x Parents would have moved to the USA from Québec between 1851 and 1889 (as Napoleon Beaulieu  – Eva’s dad was born in Québec according to what I have found)?

22e1d506-b158-4a07-b563-2484ec7fdb81 daddcc23-cad5-445c-94ac-fed06169f184

The original of this letter was given to me by my Mémère Lamothe. It was given to her by someone doing the family tree back then. She passed it along to me.


Marriage

Eva Beaulieu and Louis Napoléon Allard were married in Bonfield, Ontario, on January 8, 1900, when she was 17 years old.  Louis was 25.

He was a farmer. Marriage Certificate indicates that Eva immigrated from Taunton, USA. Witnesses: SHANK, Leo of Bonfield and ALLARD, Celina also of Bonfield.

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Canada’s First Francophone Prime Minister

Eva and Louis may have benefited from the compromise-seeking administration of Prime Minister Wilfrid Laurier while living in Ontario, in 1901.  As prime minister, Wilfrid Laurier fought for the autonomy of Canada and led the country through a prosperous period of growth.


Residence

They were living in Bonfield, Ontario, in 1901.

They are living with Louis’ mother, Marie Garipye Allard (Marie is noted as the head of the household) and all of his siblings per the 1901 census.  So, we assume that Louis’ dad, Hillaire Allard, has passed by this time (I cannot locate a date of death for him as of yet).


The Creation of Canada Dry Ginger Ale

Eva and Louis probably enjoyed sipping a new style of ginger ale in 1907 in Ontario. In 1907 chemist J. J. McLaughlin patented Canada Dry Ginger Ale, helping to pioneer the soda and bottled beverage industry.


Residence

They were living in Bonfield, Ontario in 1911.

Marie Garipye Allard (Louis’ mother) is living with them at this point. The census states that Eva immigrated in 1847 which we know is incorrect & there is also a note that her husband is Dorando Shenk (this isn’t accurate, but we know that she can to Canada with the Shanks).

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Louis’ Death of Mother

His mother Marie Louise passed away on November 27, 1914, in Bonfield, Ontario at the age of 60.

1854–1914


Canadian Women Win the Right to Vote

It took more than 100 years of lobbying but women finally won the right to vote in Canada in 1918 when Eva lived in Bonfield,  Ontario.  Maybe she voted in the next election?


Residence

Eva and Louis lived in Bonfield, Ontario on June 1, 1921.

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Attendance at Son, Dollard’s Wedding

Marriage Certificate for Dollard & Josephine Boissoneault indicate that Louis and Eva were witnesses.  Apr 1936 • Bonfield Ontario.

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Residence

1938 Rural Preliminary List of Electors.  Note that Louis is listed on the electors list as retired.

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Residence

Eva and Louis lived in Bonfield, Ontario in 1949.  Desneiges Lamothe (grand-daughter) said that they sold the farm during WWII and moved downtown and lived near St. Bernadette’s church (this appears to be supported by the Rural Preliminary list of Electors  below).  She and Louis had a big farm  – they had sheep, cow, horses, chickens and pigs. They used to sell wool and cotton from the sheep to send to Montréal.  They also made and sold cream made from cow utters.  They lived on the farm, off of the land.  She days that they had a big big house, had a big kitchen with large farmers table.  Fire wood stove.  She had a separate sewing room –  Eva used to make member sort through all of the odd buttons. The house had a huge dining room – had an old gramophone which she used listen to. It was a 2 story house, 3 bedrooms. The home had a parlour room. Their bedroom was on the main floor had a sleigh bed.  They had a yarn spinner, they used to spin wool and used to make member hold her arms out to make balls of wool.  I’d like to see if I can get a photo of their house or their farm, they may have some at the town hall in Bonfield if my Mémère doesn’t.  

As per the Rural Preliminary list of Electors for the Town of Bonfield for 1949.  Note that Louis is listed as a “Gentleman”.  Generally speaking  a Gentleman, needed to do no paid work to support himself and did not rely on handouts of any sort from others he would live off his investments.

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50th Wedding Anniversary

1950

  • not Eva Beaulieu and Louis Allard


    Death of Louis

    Louis passed away in 1954 in Bonfield, Ontario, at the age of 80. He had Eva had been married 54 years.  Of what did he pass from?  I wasn’t able to locate a death certificate for him


    Death of Eva

    Eva died in 1961 in Haileybury, Ontario, when she was 79 years old. Desneiges  told me that after Louis died, their daughter Marguerite took care of her. She was crippled with arthritis. She was placed in a South River nursing home for a year, maybe more, and then she was placed in Haileybury in a nursing home. Haileybury is a city in Northeastern Ontario.


    Other Side Notes

    I spoke with my Mémère further about her grand-parents.  She also commented that they were very religious.  They went to church every Sunday, and prayed a lot.  They said the rosary each night (on their knees).  She says that they went to church by horse and buggy.  She described her as a “very nice lady” and a “very loving lady”.  She added that she used to make good butter cookies.   She described her Pépère as a “quiet man”.


     Burial

    They are buried together in Bonfield Ontario.

    • not Louis Allard and Eva Beaulieu-Gravestone-Bonfield Cemetary

     

    I still have some additional work to do and things to look into and some more research do to.  I’d like to find some more photos and talk to my Mémère some more.

    Namaste

    T xo

     

 

 

 

On Genealogy: My Maternal Great Grand-Parents: Palma Duchesne & Laurette Allard

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    I’ve been trying to determine where next to follow my ancestry line to and which line to write about.   Instead of writing about some distant relative, I thought I’d start writing with those a bit closer to me and write backward.  
    I am going to start with my great grand parents on my mom’s maternal side.  

When Palma Henri Duchesne was born on August 30, 1908, in Bonfield, Ontario, his father, Médéric, was 25 and his mother, Leda, was 21.

When Laurette Allard was born on April 3, 1914, in Bonfield, Ontario, her father, Louis, was 37, and her mother, Éva, was 31.

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Palma’s Baptism

Sept 6 1908 – Paroisse St. Bernadette – Bonfield, ON

  • not Baptism

Employment

Palma worked for Canadian Pacific Railway in 1931, likely as a Rail section worker.

A little tidbit of history about the CPR and Bonfield: When the Canada Central Railway became the Canadian Pacific Railway in the early 1880’s Bonfield township prospered. The CPR started its westward expansion from Bonfield, Ontario (previously called Callander Station) where the first spike was driven into a sunken railway tie in 1881. Bonfield, Ontario was inducted into Canadian Railway Hall of Fame in 2002 as the CPR First Spike location.

He advanced to work for Trans Canada Highway in 1932 which paid a then high income of $5.00/month.

He took on a second job working evenings as a Baker for Ovide Martin.  Completing the highway’s assignment, Ovide offered Palma a full-time position.


Marriage

Palma Henri Duchesne married Laurette Allard in Bonfield, Ontario, on May 16, 1933 at St. Bernadette’s Parish.

Palma was 25, Laurette was 19. He is noted as being a Farmer’s son. She was “at home”. Both could read and write.

  • not Marriage Certificate

    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Desneiges Adrianne was born on January 31, 1934 (my grand-mother).


    Birth of Son

    Son Lucien was born on June 15, 1935.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Rita was born on August 15, 1936.


    Birth of Son

    Son Paul was born on May 27, 1938.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Aline was born in 1939.


    Death of Daughter

    Daughter Aline passed away on August 8, 1939, when she was less than a year old.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Eva was born on August 1, 1941, in Ontario.


    Birth of Son

    Leo Omer was born on October 19, 1942.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Cécile was born on August 12, 1945.


    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Irène Léoni was born on August 18, 1946, in Ontario.


    Palma Opens Duchesne Groceries

    In 1946 while he working unloading his truck, a log rolled off and struck him. The incident left him unable to work in logging any longer, he had to seek other employment.  By now he had 8 children and a wife at home.  Times were hard, so Palma made the life changing decision to mortgage his house and extend it to build a variety store in 1947.

    By 1950 the variety store had become a grocery store.  Duchesne groceries was located at 115 Schayer Street in Bonfield.

    • not Palma & Laurette at Magazin Duchesne

    Birth of Daughter

    Daughter Léa Alice was born on February 9, 1947.


    Residence

    1949 – As per the Canada, Voters Lists, 1935-1980

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    Inaugural Session of 1951 Bonfield Council

    Palma started serving on the Bonfield Town Council and did so for 25 years.

    not Inaugural Session of 1951 Bonfield Council

    Birth of Son

    His son André Patrick was born on March 18, 1953.


    Laurette’s Death of Father

    Her father Louis Napoléon passed away in 1954 in Bonfield, Ontario, at the age of 80.

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 2.55.00 PM


    Employment

    In 1954 Palma bought a brand new pick up truck and converted it so that he could transport groceries and merchandise to Grand Desert (in the south west corner of the township) on a regular basis.

    Palma also began using his truck to transport school children along a regular route. He continued this until 1967, when the truck was replaced by a small bus. A large regulation sized bus was finally purchased and in use by 1967.


    Birth and Death of Daughter

    Daughter Marie was born in 1955 and passed away that same day.


    Grand-Daughter’s Baptism

    January 20 1956 – Mona Lamothe

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    Birth of Son

    Son Jean was born in April 1958 in Ontario.


    Palma’s Death of Father

    When Palma was 52 years old, his father Médéric passed away on December 12, 1960, in Ontario at the age of 77.


    Palma’s Death of Mother

    His mother Leda passed away on October 3, 1966, at the age of 79.


    Laurette’s Death of Mother

    Her mother Éva passed away in 1961 in Haileybury, Ontario, at the age of 79.

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 2.47.42 PM


    1974 – Birth of First Great Grand-Child

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    Photo:  Mémère & Pépère Duchesne, Baby Tina & Mona

    Employment

    Palma decides to close Duchesne Groceries.  There was no more grocery store in Bonfield.


    Death of Daughter

    Daughter Rita passed away in 1976 in Toronto, Ontario, at the age of 40.


    4 Generations – 1976 

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    Laurette, Desneiges, Mona & Tina

    Palma’s Death

    Palma died in April 1976 in Ontario when he was 67 years old.

    According to the A History of the Township of Bonfield Centennial Book, Palma died of lung cancer.


    In 1977, the house was sold to their son, Léo. Léo, his wife Nicole live there to this day (2018).


    Residence

    Laurette lived in Mattawa, Ontario, from 1977 to 1985.

    She had a boyfriend who lived there as well as her son, Lucien. After her boyfriend passed away, Laurette decided to move to Kitchener ON

    Residence: 1977-1985 • Mattawa, Nipissing, Ontario, Canada

    Residence

    1985 – After deciding to move to Kitchener, Laurette was at home in Mattawa packing when she suffered a massive stroke, leaving her paralyzed on her left side and totally blind.  She was transported to KW Hospital (now Grand River Hospital) in Kitchener and was then transferred to Freeport Hospital (a long term care facility) in Kitchener (3570 King St. East).  She resided there until her death.

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 9.13.00 PM

    IMG_1651

    Laurette’s Death

    Laurette died on March 2, 1990, in Kitchener, Ontario, when she was 75 years old.  She died at Freeport Hospital.

    She is buried with her husband Palma in Bonfield ON

     

    Screen Shot 2018-01-27 at 3.05.57 PM

Namaste

T xo


 

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Palma Duchesne, René & Thelma (Lamothe) Besner, Clifford Duchesne  – cannot make out the other 2 and Laurette (Allard) Duchsne

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Genealogy: Filles du roi – Descendants of Jeanne-Claude Boisandré

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Most Canadians are familiar with the King’s Daugther’s/Filles du roi.  The Filles du roi, were some 770 women who arrived in the colony of New France (Canada) between 1663 and 1673, under the financial sponsorship of King Louis XIV of France. Most were single French women, many were orphans. Their transportation to Canada and settlement in the colony were paid for by the King. Some were given a royal gift of a dowry of 50 livres for their marriage to one of the many unmarried male colonists in Canada.

Colonization of New France

I am as French Canadian was they come, but, before I get into the story of my descendant, I want to talk a bit about colonizing New France.  The first settler was brought to Quebec by Samuel de Champlain – the apothecary Louis Hébert and his family, of Paris. They came expressly to settle, stay in one place to make the New France settlement function. Waves of recruits came in response to the requests for men with specific skills, like farming, apothecaries, blacksmiths. As couples married, cash incentives to have large families were put in place, and were effective.

To strengthen the colony and make it the centre of France’s colonial empire, Louis XIV decided to send single women, aged between 15 and 30 known as the King’s Daughters/ les filles du roi, to New France, paying for their passage and granting goods or money as a dowry. Approximately 800 arrived during 1663–1673. The King’s Daughters found husbands among the male settlers within a year or two, as well as a new life for themselves. They came on their own accord, many because they could not make a favourable marriage in the social hierarchy in France. By 1672, the population of New France had risen to 6,700, from 3,200 in 1663.

At the same time, marriages with the natives were encouraged, and indentured servants, Screen Shot 2017-12-19 at 1.49.45 PM.pngknown as engagés, were also sent to New France.

The women played a major role in establishing family life, civil society, and enabling rapid growth. There was a high demand for children, for they contributed to the prosperity of the farm from an early age, and there was plenty of food for them. Women bore about 30% more children than comparable women who remained in France. Landry says, “Canadians had an exceptional diet for their time. This was due to the natural abundance of meat, fish, and pure water; the good food conservation conditions during the winter; and an adequate wheat supply in most years.”

Besides household duties, some women participated in the fur trade, the major source of cash in New France. They worked at home alongside their husbands or fathers as merchants, clerks and provisioners. Some were widows who took over their husband’s roles. A handful were active entrepreneurs in their own right

I also want to take a moment to be clear – the indigenous peoples had been living on this territory for millennia. That is, well before the Vikings ventured so far East or the French “colonized” it or the English took over.  So,  I don’t believe they discovered a new territory, the native people were here long beforehand.  They just colonized it made in their own in the name of the King of France.  

Jeanne- Claude Boisandré

I actually descend from several files du roi and filles a marier – but today I am going to focus on Jeanne-Claude Boisandré (1644-1671). A.k.a. Jeanne -Claude Duboisandré was the daughter of Sieur Jacques de Boisandré the Ormelée and Mary Vieuville.

When Jeanne Claude De Boisandre was born in about 1631 in Caen, Calvados, France, her father, Jacques, was 51, and her mother, Marie, was 46.

She married Pierre Rancourt in Saint- Jean, Caen, France.  This IS the line from which I descend … 

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After the passing of her first husband on or about July 24, 1667 in Caen, Departement du Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France, she became a widow Filles du roi and made passage to Canada with her two sons to help settle the new colony of La Nouvelle France.  

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Arrival of the Filles du roi
A view of women coming to Quebec in 1667, in order to be married to the French Canadian farmers. Talon and Laval are waiting for the arrival of the women (Watercolor by Eleanor Fortescue Brickdale, 1871-1945. Courtesy of Library and Archives Canada, Acc. no 1996-371-1).
LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA, ACC. NO 1996-371-1

Louis De La Chaise, was the son of Louis and Marie De la Chaise George. Although he is the husband of my 7x GGM, I have a lot of respect for him.  He chose to marry her even though she was widowed and had two children from her previous marriage. For a time he provided them with shelter, a home and being cared for. 

From the Quebec, Genealogical Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanguay Collection), 1608-1890:Screen Shot 2017-12-19 at 12.37.16 PM

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Paroisse Notre Dame church record of the marriage between De La Chaise and Boisandre

She married Jean Létourneau, son of David Létourneau and Sébastienne Guery January 15, 1668 in Ile d’Orleans, Quebec shortly after De La Chaise died.

Most of the millions of people of French Canadian descent today are descendants of one or more of these courageous women of the 17th century!

Jeanne Claude De Boisandre died on July 24, 1671, in Ste-Famille, Quebec, when she was 41 years old.

Fast forward – as we all know, New France will lose the 7 years war to Britain and will fall, relaying power to the Brits, then commences the dawn of British North America.

My Lineage 

Jeanne- Claude Boisandré + Pierre Rancourt (7th Great Grand Parents)

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Joseph Noel Rancourt + Marie Parent (6th Great Grand Parents)

Joseph was born in 1655 in Saint-Jean-de-Lizieux , Normandy, France.

Arrived in New France in 1685

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He married Marie Parent, daughter of Pierre Parent and Jeanne Badeau on February 5, 1685 in Beauport, Capitale-Nationale, Québec, Canada .

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He married Françoise Davaux , daughter of Charles Davaux and Marguerite Aubigny September 18, 1701 in La Visitation -de -Notre- Dame, Chateau- Richer, Capitale-Nationale.

He died March 21, 1719 at Notre-Dame, Quebec. He was buried March 21, 1719 in Notre- Dame, Quebec.|

Charles Francois Rancourt + Marie Françoise Duquet dit Durochers (5th Great Grand Parents)

Screen Shot 2017-12-27 at 8.33.59 PMScreen Shot 2017-12-27 at 8.34.59 PM.png

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Charles Alexandre Rancourt + Marie Josephe Montmigny (4th Great Grand Parents)

Charles BIRTH 15 JUL 1729 Québec, Québec, Quebec, Canada

Charles DEATH 26 MAR 1774 St-Joseph De Beauce, Chaudière-Appalaches, Quebec, Canada

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Louis Rancourt + Emelie Terre (Thare/Therre) (3rd Great Grand Parents)

Louis was born on November 26, 1807, in Quebec City, Quebec

Louis died on March 25, 1847, in Calumet, Quebec, when he was 39 years old.

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Olive Rancourt + Patrick James Mullen (2nd Great Grand Parents)

PJ was born on 22 Dec 1825 in County Londonderry, Ireland, UK. 

.

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I’ve found a note that in 1851 there was a Patrick James Mullen was at the Ballycastle Poor Law Union, in Antrim, Northern Ireland.  So, he may hav been in a workhouse, each Poor Law Union in Ireland contained at least one workhouse. This was back breaking work.  Maybe he was in there during the Great Irish Potato Famine from which lasted from 1845 – 1852?  Maybe this was why he decided to leave Ireland? We know little about his parents – who I have listed as Michael Mullen and either Nancy McGinnis or Nancy MCannus according to the Pontiac Records.

He is said to have immigrated to Canada in 1861.

It is family folklore that Patrick James Mullen left Ireland because he did not want to be a priest as his family wished. In Canada he became a schoolteacher (this is confirmed on the census’) and married Olive Rancourt on March 5, 1867.  He is also my dad’s namesake – whose name is Patrick James Richards.

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Angelina Mullen + Ambrose Richards (Great Grand Parents)

I understand from Chicky (Mary Rowlands) that Angelina’s mother died when she was quite young (I looked at the records she was 8 years old) and she then lived with another family in Calumet (this may be, but, I cannot find any proof of this because by the next census, her dad was a widower and living with the Lee Family). She knew that her father came from Ireland and that it had been intended that he would become a priest and that he was a school teacher. Other than these facts we know very little about PJ Mullen.

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Benjamin Richards + Sarah Lee (Grand Parents)

Refer to my blogs on each of my grandparents – Grampa Benny’s WWII blog and The Lee Side of Me … about Gramma Sally’s side of the family from Yorkshire, England.

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Patrick Richards + Mona Lamothe (Parents)

Patrick was born on Jan 15 1954 in Temiscaming,  Quebec , Canada and passed away November 18 2014 also in Temiscaming.

Mona was born on January 20 1956 in Bonfield, Ontario, Canada.

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MOI

Yet another interesting find and lineage in my genealogy search.  I’m really loving ALL of the interesting things I’m finding out on my genealogy journey.

Genealogy is a fascinating and compelling activity that demands the same kind of persistence and deductive reasoning as detective work. Tracing ancestors is really about solving a series of mysteries. I wonder where my search will lead me next?

Namaste

T xo

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On Genealogy: Jack Tripper is my 9th Cousin, 2x removed!

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Rev. Obadiah Holmes definitely has some Famous Kin.  I’ve covered Abe Lincoln & Amelia Earhart and now I’m covering my connection to comedic legend,  John Ritter.

Another descendant of Rev. Holmes, is Willis Carrier – the inventor of air conditioning (I really love this guy on hot, sticky, humid days!) – Carrier is his 8th great grandson.

I find the relation to John Ritter especially interesting because of his manner of death.  He passed away of an aortic dissection – the EXACT same thing that my brother, who would also be his 9th cousin, 2x removed, almost died of!  Aortic dissections are relatively uncommon. Weakened aorta walls can be congenital   –  refer to my previous blog entitled “Tough Times Don’t Last, Tough People Do” – I wonder if they run in all lines of this family?

John Ritter, is probably best know for the lovably goofy closet heterosexual Jack Tripper in the television comedy series ‘‘Three’s Company,” a smash hit in the 1970’s.   Jack’s character is of the lucky man who shares an apartment with two beautiful women, Chrissy, played by Suzanne Somers, and Janet, played by Joyce DeWitt. I used to love watching Jack, Janet and Chrissy and still love watching the reruns to this day! 

Early Life

Johnathan Southworth Ritter was born in Burbank, California, on September 17, 1948. He was the son of legendary country singer/actor Tex Ritter and his wife, actress Dorothy Fay. The couple married in 1941 and had their first child, Tom Ritter, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy.

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 4.41.00 PM.pngJohn was destined to follow in his parents footsteps. He was enrolled at Hollywood High School where he was student body president. After graduation from high school, he attended the University of Southern California where he majored in Psychology and minored in Architecture. His first appearance on TV was in 1966 as a contestant on The Dating Game (1965) where he won a vacation to Lake Havasu, Arizona. After making his very first cameo appearance, he was induced to join an acting class taught by Nina Foch. He changed his major to Theatre Arts, graduating in 1971 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Drama. He also studied acting with Stella Adler at the Harvey Lembeck Comedy Workshop. Between 1968 and 1969, he appeared in a series of stage plays in England, Scotland, Holland and in Germany.

Filmography

His TV debut came playing a campus revolutionary on Dan August (1970) which starred Burt Reynolds and Norman Fell, who later starred with him on Three’s Company . Then he appeared as “Reverend Matthew Fordwick” on The Waltons (1971). He continued making more guest appearances on Medical Center (1969), M*A*S*H (1972), The Bob Newhart Show (1972), The Streets of San Francisco (1972), Kojak (1973), Rhoda (1974) and Mary Tyler Moore (1970).

The following year, in late 1975, ABC picked up the rights for a new series based on a British sitcom, Man About the House (1973). Ritter beat out 50 people, including a young Billy Crystal, to get a major role. The first pilot was trashed, and in order for it to be improved, Joyce DeWitt, an unknown actress, played the role of “Janet Wood”, along with Suze Lanier-Bramlett as the dumb blonde, “Chrissy Snow”. It did better than the first pilot, but the producers still needed a change and Suzanne Somers came to the show at the very last minute to play “Chrissy”. Thus the series, Three’s Company, was born. 

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 4.38.01 PMIn 1980, when Three’s Company was sold into syndication, the show became a ratings phenomenon. At the height of Ritter’s popularity, he won a Golden Globe in 1983 for Best Performance by an Actor after being nominated twice for Best TV Actor in a Musical-Comedy Series and, one year later, he won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor In a Comedy Series after being nominated twice. By its eighth season, the show began to drop in the ratings and was canceled in 1984. After cancellation, he starred in its spin-off, called Three’s a Crowd (1984), also starring Mary Cadorette, but it lasted for only one season.

His first animated movie was that of a man turning into a dragon, whose job was to defeat “Ommendon” in The Flight of Dragons (1982). The following year, he came back to series television as “Detective Harry Hooperman” in the comedy/drama, Hooperman (1987) for which he was nominated for both an Emmy and a Golden Globe in 1988 for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. He also won a People’s Choice Award for this role. He continued doing more box-office films such as Skin Deep (1989), in which he played a womanizing, alcoholic writer whose life seemed to be falling apart at the seams. In the movies, Problem Child (1990), and Problem Child 2 (1991), he played the surrogate father of a rebellious little boy who wrought havoc on the family. He also worked on Noises Off... (1992) and Stay Tuned (1992) before returning to another TV sitcom called Hearts Afire (1992) that also starred Billy Bob Thornton. The show had well-written scripts but failed to reach a massive audience which led to its cancellation in 1995. While he was working on Hearts Afire, he played “Ward Nelson” on North (1994). Then, he had the opportunity to work with Billy Bob Thornton, in the movie Sling Blade (1996), in which Ritter played the gay manager of a department store. He also provided the voice of “Clifford” in Clifford the Big Red Dog (2000). He was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award 4 times in a row, totalling seven Emmy nominations in his 35-year career. In 1999, he was also nominated for an Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series playing the role of “George Madison” on an episode of Ally McBeal (1997).

Soon afterwards, he landed his last television role in 8 Simple Rules… for Dating My Teenage Daughter (2002), based on the popular book. On this sitcom he played “Paul Hennessey”, a loving, rational dad, who laid down the ground rules for his three children and dealt with such topics as curfews, sex, drugs, getting arrested, etc. The show was a ratings winner in its first season and won a People’s Choice Award for Best New Comedy and also won for Favourite Comedy Series by the Family Awards.

Death

On September 11, 2003, Ritter fell ill while rehearsing for 8 Simple Rules.

He began sweating profusely and vomiting, and complained of having chest pains. He was taken across the street to the Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, by coincidence the same hospital where he was born. Physicians misdiagnosed Ritter and treated him for a heart attack (this is very common as the symptoms often mimic those of a heat attack).  However, his condition worsened. Physicians later diagnosed Ritter with an aortic dissection. Ritter died during surgery to repair the dissection, six days before his 55th birthday. This is were I’m in awe.  I hear of John Ritter and Alan Thicke dying in surgery for aortic dissections and yet my brother lived during the same surgery – was he ever blessed and he had an amazing thoracic cardiac surgeon in Dr. Ash.  

A private funeral was held on September 15 in Los Angeles, after which Ritter was interred at Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills Cemetery in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles. He died on his daughter Stella’s birthday 😦 

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John Ritter’s star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is next to his father’s (see photos below).

He left behind four children: Jason Ritter, (born on Sunday, February 17, 1980), Carly Ritter, (born on Monday, March 1, 1982), Tyler Ritter, (born on Thursday, January 31, 1985) and Stella Ritter, (born on Friday, September 11, 1998).

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I’m excited to see what connection I make next and from which line!

Namaste

T xo


 

On Genealogy: Say What? I’m Connected To Amelia Earhart!

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Aviation, this young modern giant, exemplifies the possible relationship of women and the creations of science. Although women have not taken full advantage of its use and benefits, air travel is as available to them as to men ~ Amelia Earhart

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My lineage just gets better and better!  To date I have discovered a relation to a  King of France, a US President, a Filles du Roi, an explorer,  a colleague of Samuel de Champlain, a great Uncle who died in WWI in Flanders … these are just some of my finds … and NOW …. a relation to the great aviatrix Amelia Earhart!

It’s one of the greatest unsolved mysteries!  It’s been 80 years and no resolution. I have long been fascinated by the story of Amelia Earhart.  I have watched numerous documentaries about her disappearance on History, Nat Geo, CNN etc.  The story fascinated me long before I discovered our distant relation.  Amelia is my 9th cousin, 2 x removed via the Obadiah Holmes line – the same lineage that my relation to President Honest Abe Lincoln comes from.  So RICHARDS family, this one is also for you!

Background

Amelia was born on July 24, 1897, in Atchison, Kansas, USA, to Amelia Otis, age 28, and Edwin Stanton Earhart, age 26.

Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 10.10.26 PMAs you may well know, Amelia Earhart was an Aviation Pioneer. Her flying career began in Los Angeles in 1921 when, at age 24, she took flying lessons from Neta Snook and bought her first airplane, a Kinner Airstar. Due to family problems, she sold her airplane in 1924 and moved back East, where she took employment as a Social Worker.

Four years later, she returned to aviation bought an Avro Avian airplane and became the first woman to make a solo-return transcontinental flight. From then on, she continued to set and break her own speed and distance records, in competitive events, as well as personal stunts promoted by her husband George Palmer Putnam.

Marriage to George Putnam

Amelia married George Palmer Putnam in Noank, Connecticut, USA, on February 7, 1931, when she was 33 years old.

A little about George:  In July 1927 he was responsible for the blockbuster publication of “We”, Charles Lindbergh‘s autobiographical account of his early life and Orteig Prize winning non-stop transatlantic solo flight from New York to Paris made in May of that year. The book proved to be one of the most successful non-fiction titles of all time selling more than 650,000 copies in less than a year and earning its author over $250,000, which is the 2017 equivalent of $3,410,056.50.

A significant event in Putnam’s personal and business life occurred in 1928, before the merger. Because of his reputation for working with Lindbergh, he was contacted by Amy Guest, a wealthy American living in London who wanted to sponsor the first-ever flight by a woman across the Atlantic Ocean.

Guest asked Putnam to find a suitable candidate and he eventually came up with the then-unknown aviatrix, Amelia Earhart.As it turned out, they shared many common interests: hiking, swimming, camping, riding, tennis and golf. When Putnam first met Earhart, he was still married to Binney. After she successfully completed her flight across the Atlantic, Putnam offered to help Earhart write a book about her flight, following the formula he had established with Charles Lindbergh in the writing of “WE”. The resulting Earhart book was 20 Hrs., 40 Min. (1928).

When they began writing, Putnam invited Earhart to live in his home because he felt like it would make the process easier. Shortly after, Binney left for South America which was followed by the divorce of George and Dorothy Putnam in 1929. Putnam had undertaken to heavily promote Earhart in a campaign that included a series of lecture tours and using pictures of her image in mass market endorsements for products including luggage, Lucky Strike cigarettes (this caused image problems for her, with McCall’s magazine retracting an offer) and other products.

In 1930, the various Putnam heirs voted to merge the family’s publishing firm with Minton, Balch & Co., which became the majority stockholders. George P. Putnam resigned from his position as secretary of G. P. Putnam’s Sons and joined New York publishers Brewer & Warren as vice president.

Putnam and Earhart made their relationship official shortly after his divorce was finalized, but they didn’t marry until 1931.

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Photo: Amelia & George, circa 1935

Accomplishments

She became a household name in 1932 when she became the first woman, and second person, to fly solo across the Atlantic, on the fifth anniversary of Charles Lindbergh’s feat, flying a Lockheed Vega from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland to Londonderry, Ireland. That year, she received the Distinguished Flying Cross from the Congress, the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor from the French Government, and the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society from President Hoover.

In January 1935 she became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean from Honolulu to Oakland, California. Later that year she soloed from Los Angeles to Mexico City and back to Newark, N.J.

In July 1936 she took delivery of a Lockheed 10E “Electra,” financed by Purdue University, and started planning her round-the-world flight. Her flight would not be the first to circle the globe, but it would be the longest, 29,000 miles, following an equatorial route – the longest in history.

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On March 17, 1937 she flew the first leg in her state of the art, twin-engine Lockheed 10 Electra from Oakland, California to Honolulu, Hawaii. As the flight resumed three days later, a tire blew on takeoff and she ground-looped the plane. Severely damaged, the aircraft had to be shipped back to California for repairs, and the flight was called off.

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Photo: Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan

Her Greatest Journey – To Circumnavigate Around the World Was Not To Be 

Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 10.08.24 PM.pngThe second attempt would begin on May 20 1937 heading East; Fred Noonan, a former Pan Am pilot, would be her navigator and sole companion in flight for the entire trip. Their last known refuelling stop was in Southeast Asia, when they arrived at Lae, New Guinea on July 2 1937. About 22,000 miles of the journey had been completed. The remaining 7,000 miles would all be over the Pacific Ocean. Their intended destination was Howland Island (their next refuelling stop), a tiny piece of land a few miles long, 20 feet high, and 2,556 miles away. Their last positive position report and sighting were over the Nukumanu Islands, about 800 miles into the flight. Earhart and Noonan are never seen alive again.

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The United States Coast Guard cutter Itasca was on station near Howland, assigned on short notice to communicate with her plane and guide her to the island once she arrived in the vicinity. But it soon became evident that she and Noonan had little practical knowledge of the use of radio navigation. The frequencies she was using were not well suited to direction finding (in fact, she had left behind the lower-frequency reception and transmission equipment which might have enabled Itasca to locate her), and the reception quality of her transmissions was poor. After six hours of frustrating attempts at two-way communications, contact was lost. A coordinated search by the Navy and Coast Guard was organized and no physical evidence of the flyers or their plane was ever found. Their fate has been the subject of many rumors and allegations which were never substantiated. Modern analysis indicates that after passing the Nukumanu Islands, she began to vector off course, unwittingly heading for a point about 100 miles NNW of Howland. A few hours before their estimated arrival time Noonan calculated a “sun line,” but without a successful, radio-frequency range calculation, a precise “fix” on the plane’s location could not be established.

According to the crash and sink theory, Earhart’s plane ran out of gas while she searched for Howland Island, and she crashed into the open ocean somewhere in the vicinity of the island.

Several expeditions over the past 15 years have attempted to locate the plane’s wreckage on the sea floor near Howland. High-tech sonar and deep-sea robots have failed to yield clues about the Electra’s crash site.

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Theories About Their Disappearance

There are numerous conspiracy theories about Earhart’s disappearance.

  1. The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) postulates that Earhart and Noonan veered off-course from Howland Island and landed instead some 350 miles to the Southwest on Gardner Island, now called Nikumaroro, in the Republic of Kiribati. The island was uninhabited at the time.

A week after Earhart’s disappeared, Navy planes flew over the island. They noted recent signs of habitation but found no evidence of an airplane.  TIGHAR believes that Earhart—and perhaps Noonan—may have survived for days or even weeks on the island as castaways before dying there. Since 1988, several TIGHAR expeditions to the island have turned up artifacts and anecdotal evidence in support of this hypothesis.

Some of the artifacts include a piece of Plexiglas that may have come from the Electra’s window, a woman’s shoe dating back to the 1930s, improvised tools, a woman’s cosmetics jar from the 1930s and bones that appeared to be part of a human finger.

In June 2017, a TIGHAR-led expedition arrived on Nikumaroro with four forensically trained bone-sniffing border collies to search the island for any skeletal remains of Earhart or Noonan.

2) Another theory posits that Earhart and Noonan were captured and executed by the Japanese, and were captured as POWs.

3) Another theory claims that the pair served as spies for the Roosevelt administration and assumed new identities upon returning to the United States.

4) The final theory, and likely most realistic is that they ran out of fuel, having not been able to locate Howland Island and crashed into the sea.

What do you think happened?

My Lineage 

My Lineage to the Obadiah Holmes line ..

Rev. Obadiah Holmes (10th Great Grand Father)

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Martha Holmes

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Hannah Audley

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Abigail Devol

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Job Milk II

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Sarah Milk

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Roger Moore

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Ambrose Richards

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George Richards

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Ambrose Richards

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Benjamin Richards

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Patrick Richards

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MOI

Starting from the Obadiah Holmes line to Amelia ….

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Namaste

T xo

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On Genealogy: I always knew I was a Princess! My Relation to King VIII of France!

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Ok, I’m all over the place with this ancestry stuff.  I just moved, am sick in bed but can’t stop researching.  Each line steers me to something new and exciting – I’m honestly just just jumping around when I find a new cool hint – I follow it and away I go – on a brand spanking new tangent.

I always knew I was special – a princess you might say – now I have something to back it up  – my 24th great grand-father was King Louis VIII of France.  

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In all honesty, I know very little about my 24x GGF, but, from what I’ve seen on the line (Internship joke) Louis VIII the Lion (aka Louis VIII le Lion) (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) was King of France from 1223 to 1226 (only 3 years). He also claimed the title King of England from 1216 to 1217. Louis VIII was born in Paris, the son of King Philip II of France and Isabelle of Hainaut, from whom he inherited the County of Artois at Palais Royal, Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France.

On 23 May 1200, at the age of 12 (what????, 12!!!), Louis was married to Blanche of Castile, daughter of King Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England, the sister of King Richard I and King John of England. The marriage could only be concluded after prolonged negotiations between King Philip II of France and Blanche’s uncle John.

Louis VIII succeeded his father on 14 July 1223; his coronation took place on 6 August of the same year in the cathedral at Reims.

Born to wealth, Blanche of Castile (1188-1252) took the reins of leadership early in life as the wife of Louis VIII, King of France and later as co-regent during her son, Louis IX’s, minority. She proved to be a good, albeit strong willed leader, keenly adept at dealing with her male counterparts.

Blanche of Castile was born on March 4, 1188 in Palencia, Castile, an area that is now part of central and northern Spain. She was the daughter of King Alphonso VIII of Castile and Princess Eleanor Plantagenet of England. Her grandfather was Henry II of England, her grandmother was Eleanor of Aquitane and her uncle was John I of England. This rich lineage prepared her well for a place on the throne of France.

Screen Shot 2017-12-02 at 9.52.27 PMDuring Louis VIII’s short reign, Blanche confined her activities to the education and upbringing of her children. She was especially careful of the education of her favorite son, Louis. She was a stern Christian and taught him to be pious and devoted to the services of the church.

In 1236 Louis came of age but Blanche remained at his side—his strongest supporter and advisor. Louis proved to be an energetic king devoted to his people. He was a devout Roman Catholic, austere and prayerful and a devoted husband and father.  Blanche of Castile suffered with a heart ailment, but continued to preside over court responsibilities. In 1252 she suffered a heart attack while on her way to the Abbey of the Lys for a retreat. She was returned to the Palace of the Louvre in Paris where she received the last rights and died.

The King died of dysentery (is a type of gastroenteritis that results in diarrhea with blood.) on November 8, 1226 (39).  The Saint Denis Basilica houses the tomb of Louis VIII.

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Louis and Blanche had thirteen children:

  1. Unnamed daughter [Blanche?] (1205 – died soon after).
  2. Philip (9 September 1209 – before July 1218), betrothed in July 1215 to Agnes of Donzy.
  3. Alphonse (b. and d. Lorrez-le-Bocage, 26 January 1213), twin of John.
  4. John (b. and d. Lorrez-le-Bocage, 26 January 1213), twin of Alphonse.
  5. Louis IX (Poissy, 25 April 1214 – 25 August 1270, Tunis), King of France as successor to his father.
  6. Robert (25 September 1216 – 9 February 1250, killed in battle, Mansoura, Egypt), Count of Artois.
  7. Philip (20 February 1218 – 1220).
  8. John (21 July 1219 – 1232), Count of Anjou and Maine; betrothed in March 1227 to Yolande of Brittany.
  9. Alphonse (Poissy, 11 November 1220 – 21 August 1271, Corneto), Count of Poitou and Auvergne, and by marriage, of Toulouse.
  10. Philip Dagobert (20 February 1222 – 1232.
  11. Isabelle (March 1224 – 23 February 1270).
  12. Stephen (end 1225 – early 1227).
  13. Charles (posthumously 21 March 1227 – 7 January 1285), Count of Anjou and Maine, by marriage Count of Provence and Forcalquier, and King of Sicily

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Now I’m impressed, what is going to top this?  Maybe not too much, but that does not mean that there isn’t a lot of exciting stuff to learn about my GENES & my ANCESTRY, I guess we will have to see ….

Namaste

T xo


 

On Genealogy: My Connection to President Lincoln

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So this was the MOST EXCITING ancestral find to date!  The connection, albeit distant – with the most impressive US Presidents of all time – Honest Abe is my 6th cousin 5x removed.

I posted yesterday on my connection to Obadiah Holmes – the important member of the Baptist church who was whipped for his beliefs – this amazing man was the 5th great grand-father of another revolutionary man who needs no introduction or biography, the great emancipator, Abraham Lincoln!

My Lineage – Off of the Obadiah Holmes Line

Obadiah Holmes (10th Great Grand Father)

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Martha Holmes

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Hannah Audley

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Abigail Devol

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Job Milk II

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Sarah Milk

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Roger Moore

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Ambrose Richards

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George Richards

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Ambrose Richards

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Benjamin Richards

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Patrick Richards

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MOI

 

How I am connected to President Lincoln:

Rev. Obadiah Holmes + Katherine Hyde

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Lydia Holmes + Capt. John Brown

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Hannah Salter + Mordecai Lincoln

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John Lincoln + Rebecca Flower

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Capt. Abraham Lincoln + Bethesda Herring

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Thomas Lincoln + Nancy Hanks

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President Abraham Lincoln + Mary Todd

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 Screen Shot 2017-11-28 at 9.52.36 PM.pnguntil his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, paved the way for the abolition of slavery.

In 1840, Lincoln became engaged to Mary Todd, who was from a wealthy slave-holding family in Lexington, Kentucky. They met in Springfield, Illinois, in December 1839 and were engaged the following December. A wedding set for January 1, 1841, was canceled when the two broke off their engagement.  They later met again at a party and married on November 4, 1842, in the Springfield mansion of Mary’s married sister.

The couple had four children. Robert Todd Lincoln was born in 1843 and Edward Baker Screen Shot 2017-11-28 at 9.53.40 PM.pngLincoln (Eddie) in 1846. Edward died on February 1, 1850, in Springfield, probably of tuberculosis. “Willie” Lincoln was born on December 21, 1850, and died of a fever on February 20, 1862. The Lincolns’ fourth son, Thomas “Tad” Lincoln, was born on April 4, 1853, and died of heart failure at the age of 18 on July 16, 1871. Robert was the only child to live to adulthood and have children.

On November 6, 1860, Lincoln was elected the 16th president of the United States, beating Douglas, Breckinridge, and Bell. He was the first president from the Republican Party.

On June 19, 1862, endorsed by Lincoln, Congress passed an act banning slavery on all federal territory.  Lincoln drafted the Emancipation Proclamation. In it, he stated that “as a fit and necessary military measure, on January 1, 1863, all persons held as slaves in the Confederate states will thenceforward, and forever, be free”.  The Emancipation Proclamation, issued on September 22, 1862, and put into effect on January 1, 1863.

President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth on Good Friday, April 14, 1865, while attending a play at Ford’s Theatre as the American Civil War was drawing to a close. The assassination occurred five days after the surrender of Robert E. Lee and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia.  Lincoln died at 7:22 a.m. on April 15.

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In surveys of U.S. scholars ranking presidents conducted since the 1940s, Lincoln is consistently ranked in the top three, often as number one.

Nicknames

  • The Ancient One, a nickname favored by White House insiders because of his “ancient wisdom”
  • The Great Emancipator and The Liberator for the emancipation of the slaves
  • Honest Abe
  • The Rail-Splitter
  • The Tycoon for the energetic and ambitious conduct of his Civil War administration
  • Uncle Abe for his avuncularity in his later years

Pretty INTERESTING FIND to see that I have some connection to a US President – like I said coming from Canada this line is FULL of amazing discoveries.  Only this ONE line goes back to the States, let alone all of the way back to the foundation – it’s also very exciting that in Canada I am also related to a Filles Du Row and Filled a Married – which is Canada’s equivalent of coming over on the Mayflower.

Tune in for the next blog to see what else I discover …

Namaste

T xo


On Genealogy: Whipped for Baptist Beliefs – My Connection to Rev. Obadiah Holmes

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Ok, it’s safe to say we all know that I’m a genealogy NUT, I won’t even try to deny it.  I love learning and I love history, especially when it comes to MY OWN.  They say to know where you’re going, you’ve got to know where you’ve been.  I believe in knowing the trials, tribulations and successes my family has gone through, endured, surmounted and overcome, I can better understand a part of myself – and mainly teach this to my own children and to my family.  I believe I’m the first in my family to have undertaken such an in depth look at ALL lines of our family.  Sometimes I get so excited with where each branch goes, I don’t know where to go next after I’ve followed one to something exciting.

Yesterday I wrote about my familial connection to the Salem Witch Trials and I could have and likely should have stayed with that line as original settlers to the new colony, but something else piqued my interest in another line and off I went …

In going through my photo and story hints in my Ancestry.ca site, I came across a photo that someone had posted about a distant relative by the name of Obadiah Holmes.  Being Canadian, I’m astounded to see such American roots and the importance that some of my ancestors/colonial descendants have.  I had NO IDEA who Obediah Holmes was before starting this research and this blog.  A quick check online and up came a litany of information,  videos, articles and movies/documentaries on HIM.  In all honesty, I was going to write this blog about one of Obadiah’s famous descendants, but as I researched him and his significance to American history and the Baptist church, I felt it was worth writing about.

I’ll add the link to” The American family of Rev. Obadiah Holmes”  here for you to take a look at, but, I’ll provide a brief synopsis of his ancestry:

Arrival to the New Colony:

The decade of the 1630’s so disheartened England’s Puritans that they left their homeland in shipload after shipload to create a newer and purer England far away. These were the years of the Great Puritan Migration and Obadiah Holmes also “adventured the danger of the seas to come to New England.” Holmes and his wife probably sailed from Preston (just north of Liverpool), down the River Ribble, across the Irish Sea, and into the open Atlantic. They had an extremely stormy voyage that prevented them from entering Boston harbor until six weeks had passed. Soon after landing at Boston, most likely in the summer or early fall of 1638, they made their way up the coast and settled at Salem, Massachusetts.  Later removed to Rehoboth in Plymouth Colony.

Obadiah is said to have brought the first pendulum clock to America. This timepiece, one of the first of the kind ever constructed, is still doing duty in the cabinet of the Long Island and Historical Society, Brooklyn, having been presented to them by John Holmes Baker, Esq., a descendant.

Born Obadiah was born/baptized March 18, 1610 in Didsbury Chapel, County of Lancashire, England.  His father, Robert, was 31 and his mother, Katherine, was 26.
Died 15 October 1682 at Newport, Rhode island
Resting place Holmes Cemetery, Middletown, Rhode Island
Education It is said that he attended Oxford in England, but it is not certain if he graduated.
Occupation

The young Salem settlement encouraged Obadiah and his co-workers in the development of what may have been the first glass factory in North America. They made the common window glass.

Obadiah performed other duties befitting a good citizen; he surveyed and set boundaries for the land of another citizen.

In February, 1643; he accepted an appointment by the town in September 1644 to cut and gather firewood for the church elders.

He often served on juries during his years of residence at Salem.

He succeeded Dr. John Clarke & became the minister of the First Baptist Church in America. The church at Newport was his permanent charge for more than thirty years until his death.

Spouse Married Katherine Hyde (1608 – 1682) at the age of 21.  They were married in Manchester’s Collegiate College Church on November 20, 1630.
Children John, Jonathan, Mary, Martha, Samuel, Obadiah, Lydia, John, Hopestill
Parents Robert Hulmes / Holmes (1578 – 1649)  and Katherine Johnson (1584 – 1630)
Religious Affiliations

Obadiah soon found himself disliking the rigidity of the established church. Then came the horror (for the Puritans) known as Anabaptism. The Baptist zeal in Rhode Island was immeasurably heightened by a direct infusion of English Baptists from abroad. They were convinced that immersion or “dipping” was the only proper form of baptism. This innovation brought conflict and irritation to the Puritans, but brought peace and serenity, at last, to Obadiah Holmes.

He was Baptized with the “new baptism” along with 8 others and became out and out Baptists, with Obadiah becoming their leader and pastor. Obadiah took the irrevocable step toward separation from New England’s official way. It took three years for the membership of the Rehoboth church to become divided on doctrinal and legal lines and become aligned behind the minister and Obadiah as the respective leaders. Obadiah’s conversion to the distinctive views of the Baptists was developed here. He became the leader of the Schismatists (he formal separation of a church into two churches or the secession of a group owing to doctrinal and other differences).

Rev. Obadiah Holmes was a Baptist minister at a time when Baptists were barred from worshipping in the colony of Massachusetts.

A grand jury — included William Bradford, John Alden and Miles Standish — indicted Obadiah Holmes for heresy. He and his family left Plymouth for Newport, R.I., in 1650.

Fateful Trip to Lynn, Massachusetts

On July 16, 1651, Dr. John Clarke (pastor of the Baptist church in Newport, Rhode Island), John Crandall and Obadiah Holmes walked 80 miles from Newport, RI to Massachusetts.  The purpose of the visit was to bring spiritual comfort and communion to William Witter, a blind and aged Baptist who had invited the three to come to his house. The broader purpose was, of course, an evangelical one: to tell of the new baptism and its importance. The word was proclaimed, converts were baptized, the elements of the Lord’s Supper were served all of this done privately in William Witter’s home.  I

On Sunday, July 20, they were holding church services to a small congregation. While Dr. Clarke was reading passages of scripture, two constables, with a warrant for the 3 visitors, broke in on the scene. The offence charged against them was conducting religious services in non-conformity with the statutes. The 3 Rhode Islanders were placed under arrest and taken to the local Anchor Tavern, to be fed and to await their scheduled appearance before the General Court, early the next morning. 

In the morning, after a brief appearance before Robert Bridges in Lynn, Mass, the evangelists were sent to Boston for trial. The authorities denied the defendants the opportunity to offer a defence, they simply read the charges and imposed the fines. The court order for commitment to prison, indicated essentially four complaints against the “strangers”. They had offended by (a) conducting a private worship service at the same time as the town’s public worship; (b) “offensively disturbing” the public meeting in Lynn; (c) more seriously, “seducing and drawing aside others after their erroneous judgment and practices”; and (d) “neglecting or refusing to give in sufficient security for their appearance” at the next meeting of the county court.  

The same charges were levied against all three men, all of whom fell under the proscription of the 1645 law against Anabaptists. Clarke, was fined £20; Crandall, as a tag-along and largely silent companion, was fined only £5. Obadiah Holmes, already under the cloud of excommunication from the church in Rehoboth, received the largest fine of £30. Should they not wish to pay the set fines, they had an alternative: the culprit was to be “well whipped”. 

Holmes refused to accept the offer of friends to pay his fine, believing it would be an admission of guilt, making it a matter of his conscience and scruples. He remained in prison from July till September.  

The Whipping

On September 5, 1651, Obadiah was taken from the jail, outside to the market place, where Magistrate Increase Nowell told the “executioner” to strip Obadiah naked down to the waist after he refused to disrobe himself, saying “that for all Boston I would not give my bodie into their hands to be bruised upon another account, yet upon this I would not give the hundredth part of a Wampon Peaque to free it out of their hands, and that I made as much conscience of unbuttoning one button, as I did of paying the £30 in reference thereunto.” He was then tied to the post and publicly flogged at Devonshire & State Streets in Boston, just because he was a Baptist.  

There were thirty strokes (which was 10 lashings short of a death sentence), with a three-cord whip, Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 4.21.20 PMheld by the executioner – one lash for each pound he owed. Holmes proclaimed, “I bless God I am counted worthy to suffer for the name of Jesus.” Though he received 30 lashes, to his bare back, Obadiah is said to not have let out a groan or scream – after the whipping he uttered the words “You have struck me as with roses.”  

After the flogging and out from the crowd came forward to offer their sympathy and shake Obadiah’s hand.  John Spur and John Hazel were promptly arrested and jailed.  Obadiah’s testimony deeply affected Harvard’s President, Henry Dunster.  For weeks and weeks after the flogging had to sleep on knees and elbows. 

Life After Religious Persecution

Obadiah returned to Newport and in 1652 succeeded Dr. John Clarke. He became the minister of the First Baptist Church in America. The church at Newport was his permanent charge for more than thirty years until his death. In 1656 he was made a Freeman (in U.S. colonial times, a person not under legal restraint). He served as a Commissioner from 1656-58.

Obadiah died October 15, 1682 in Newport and was buried in his own field, where a tomb was erected to his memory (in what is now the town of Middletown). His wife did not long survive him.  He had nine children and 42 grandchildren when he died.

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Thank God for men who put principles and compassion for fellow believers above their personal safety.

Last Will & Testament

These are to signify that I, Obadiah Holmes of Newport on Rhode Island, being at present through the goodness and mercy of my God of sound memory; and, being by daily intimations put in mind of the frailty and uncertainty of this present life, do therefore – for settling my estate in this world which it has pleased the Lord to bestow upon me – make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in manner following, committing my spirit unto the Lord that gave it to me and my body to the earth from whence it was taken, in hope and expectation that it shall thence be raised at the resurrection of the just.

Imprimis, I will that all my just debts which I owe unto any person be paid by my Executor, hereafter named, in convenient time after my decease.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Brown, five pounds in money or equivalent to money.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Martha Odlin, ten pounds in the like pay.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Lydia Bowne, ten pounds.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my two grandchildren, the children of my daughter, Hopestill Taylor, five pounds each; and if either of them decease, the survivor to have ten pounds.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, John Holmes, ten pounds.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my son, Obadiah Holmes, ten pounds.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my grandchildren, the children of my son Samuel Holmes, ten pounds to be paid unto them in equal portions.

All these portions by me bequeathed, my will is, shall be paid by my Executor in money or equivalent to money.

Item. I give and bequeath unto all my grandchildren now living ten pounds; and ten shillings in the like pay to be laid out to each of them – a bible.

Item. I give and bequeath unto my grandchild, Martha Brown, ten pounds in the like pay.

All [of] which aforesaid legacies are to be paid by my Executor, hereafter named in manner here expressed: that is to say, the first payment to [be] paid within one year after the decease of my wife, Catherine {sic} Holmes, and twenty pounds a year until all the legacies be paid, and each to be paid according to the degree of age.

My will is and I do hereby appoint my son Jonathan Holmes my sole Executor, unto whom I have sold my land, housing, and stock for the performance of the same legacies above. And my will is that my Executor shall pay unto his mother, Catherine Holmes, if she survives and lives, the sum of twenty pounds in money or money pay for her to dispose of as she shall see cause.

Lastly, I do desire my loving friends, Mr. James Barker, Sr., Mr. Joseph Clarke, and Mr. Philip Smith, all of Newport, to be my overseers to see this my will truly performed. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this ninth day of April, 1681.

Obadiah Hullme [Holmes][Seal]

Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of
Edward Thurston
Weston Clarke
(Edward Thurston, Sr., and Weston Clark appeared before the Council [of Newport], December 4, 1682, and did upon their engagements [pledges] declare and own that they saw Obadiah Holmes, deceased, sign seal and deliver the above written will as his act and deed; and, at the time of his sealing hereof, he was in his perfect memory, according to the best of our understandings. Taken before the Council, as attested. Weston Clarke, Town Clerk.)

My Lineage 

Rev. Obadiah Holmes (10th Great Grand Father)

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Martha Holmes

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Hannah Audley

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Abigail Devol

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Job Milk II

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Sarah Milk

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Roger Moore

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Ambrose Richards

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George Richards

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Ambrose Richards

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Benjamin Richards

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Patrick Richards

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MOI

 

Conclusion

This was an interesting person to research, I had no idea that I was connected to such a significant man/family.  It’s warming to see how revered he is in the Baptist community.

Stay tuned for the original reason I was going to write about Obadiah – his most famous descendant …. any guesses on who it is?

Namaste

T xo

 


On Genealogy:  Great Scott! Descendants of Andrew McKenzie

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Today’s blog #7 on genealogy features my SCOTTISH roots.  Before my AncestryDNA results, I hadn’t spent too much time on this line – it follows my father’s line – through my 3x grand father George Richards’ wife, Cecelia —>  see tree below.

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I assumed we had some Scottish in us given my GGG Gramma’s last name was McKenzie.  But I hadn’t spent all that much time on this line yet.  Not because I didn’t think it wouldn’t be interesting, just that I have my hands in so many different lines at the moment that sometimes I bounce around and forget to go back to a line I started.

Ok, let’s get started ….


Generation 1 

ANDREW MCKENZIE married ELIZABETH (last name unknown).

At this stage I can’t confirm who the immigrant family was.  Was it Andrew and Elizabeth who brought over Andrew or did Andrew Jr leave his family behind in Scotland for Canada?


Generation 2

ANDREW MCKENZIE II was born about 1809 in Scotland. He died on Oct 16 1881 of “Lung Congestion” – likely Pneumonia which he suffered from for a period of 10 weeks. The Death Certificate says he was a “Bookseller” in Almonte, Ontario.

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Andrew’s Death Record – 1881

He married (1) AGNES LECKIE on 21 Oct 1836 in Ramsay Township, Ontario. She was born about 1813 in Scotland. She died on 27 Feb 1875 in Pembroke, Renfrew, Ontario, Canada.  This is the line from which I descend.

He then married (2) JANET GREVILLE TOSHACK on 08 Jan 1877 in Almonte, Ontario, daughter of William and Margaret. She was born about 1821. She died on 15 Nov 1893 in Ottawa, Ontario.

He emigrated from Scotland before 1836, but actual date is unknown.  I am unable to locate any records of his immigration to Canada, but records were not commonly kept during that time frame.  We also know that he was one of the original settlers in Lancaster County, Ontario, Canada.

In 1861 we find him living as the Head of Household in the County of Renfrew, Ontario. The census information notes that he is Scottish,  is a Labourer and is a member of the Free Church. The Free Church of Scotland was formed by Evangelicals who broke from the Church of Scotland in 1843 in protest against what they regarded as the state’s encroachment on the spiritual independence of the Church.

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Almonte Gazette, Friday, October 28, 1881: 

OBITUARY: Another old settler has gone to his last rest. Mr. Andrew McKenzie died of congestion of the lungs at his residence in Almonte on the 17th Oct., 1881, aged 72 years. Mr. McKenzie was for over twenty years a *colporteur in the service of the Ottawa Valley Branch Bible Society. In the winter time he visited the shanties in the Ottawa Valley, selling bibles to the shantymen, and speaking to them of Him who came to seek and save the lost. Dreary and long were the journeys he often took, and many were the hardships he endured, and the dangers he escaped as he passed from shanty to shanty. But his work is done, and we doubt not but he has received his Master’s approval, “Well done, good and faithful servant.” “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from henceforth; yea, saith the Lord, that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them.” 

* A colporteur is a peddler of devotional literature.

From The Renfrew Mercury, Friday, October 21, 1881:  DEAD – The corpse of Mr. A. Mackenzie, the colporteur, a former resident of Renfrew, was taken through the village on Tuesday, from Almonte, for interment in Admaston.

Andrew is mentioned in the blog Up and Down the Shantymen Used to Roam, posted on February 6, 2017 by lindaseccaspina.

Note for Andrew McKenzie:  Admaston Cemetery records show Georgina McKenzie Brown, wife of John Brown, born June 11, 1850, died March 4, 1939. It is probable that Georgina is the daughter of Andrew and Agnes since Andrew’s will mentions Georgina Brown, wife of John Brown. The will of Andrew’s second wife, Janet, refers to “Mrs. John Brown”. Georgina’s relationship to Andrew has to be verified but she is included with his children based on the circumstantial evidence in the estate files.


Generation 3

CECILIA MCKENZIE was born on 09 Dec 1851 in Ontario. She died on 12 Sep 1921 in Mattawa, Ontario. She married GEORGE RICHARDS in 1886 in Mattawa, Ontario, son of Ambrose Abraham Richards and Olive Moore. He was born on 26 Jul 1858 in Eardley Township, Ottawa County, Quebec. He died on 25 Apr 1942. Screen Shot 2017-06-25 at 11.15.40 PM

1881 Census:  George Richards, married, 23, born: in Ontario, Scottish, Farmer, Presbyterian. Rosy Richards, married, 19, Irish, born in Ontario, Presbyterian.

The next entry on this census is the family of Donald and Agnes Fraser. We find Cecelia McKenzie living there, with her sister Agnes, at the time. She and George likely knew one another and married after the death of his first wife, Rosy.  Cecelia was employed as a Seamstress.

Their son, Ambrose Richards was born in 1885 (according to his death certificate), however Cecelia and George were married in 1888.  Some 3 years later, was he born out of wedlock?


Generation 4

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Ambrose driving the grinder & Cecelia McKenzie – Richards Farm abt 1914

AMBROSE RICHARDS (B: Dec 12 1887 – Mattawa Ontario, D: 1957 – Mattawa Ontario) m. BRIDGET ANGELINA MULLEN (B: Jan 3 1887 – Vinton, Québec, D: April 10 1976 – Témiscaming, Québec) on 20 Nov 1912 in Sacre Coeur Parish, Sturgeon Falls, Nipissing, Ontario.

Of interest, Ambrose converted to Roman Catholic from Presbyterianism – apparently to marry Lina as he was baptized only 10 days before they were married.  

His Godparents were Denis Leaghy & Mary Brown.  He was baptized Catholic on 10 Nov 1912 in Sturgeon Falls, Ontario, Canada.  


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BENJAMIN GEORGE RICHARDS (B: Feb 10 1916 – Sturgeon Falls Ontario, D: June 17 1977 –Montréal, Québec) m. SARAH ANN LEE (B: Dec 7 1922 – Meltham Mills, Yorkshire England, D: March 1993 – Montréal, Quebec)

Refer to my blogs on the LEE family and Pte. Benjamin Richards for details about my grandparents.


Generation 6

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PATRICK JAMES RICHARDS (B: Jan 15 1954 – Témiscaming Québec, D: Nov 18 2014 – Témiscaming, Québec) m.  MONA ROSE LAMOTHE (B: Jan 20 1956 – Bonfield Ontario, D: —-)


Generation 7

MOI – TINA RICHARDS

Namaste

T xo

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